ADP Dealer Services Gives Users a New Social Community for Discussions About Solutions

HOFFMAN ESTATES, IL—(Marketwired – Jul 31, 2014) –  ADP Dealer Services, Inc., a division of ADP® and a leading global technology solutions provider dedicated to helping dealerships drive measurable results across every area of their operation, announced today the launch of Service Connect Community, an online forum for ADP Dealer Services' clients to share knowledge and information about software and services. Community members can post questions, get answers and provide insight to their peers directly from their ADP Dealer Management System (DMS) application(s).

“We performed an extensive amount of dealership and community forum research to better learn exactly what our clients wanted in a peer–to–peer community,” said Bill Heffern, Division Vice President of Client Relations at ADP Dealer Services. ”We learned that there was tremendous value in providing our user community a tool that helped them share information freely and learn from each other's experiences in a seamless and secure way. Service Connect Community gives our clients a place to get the answers they want from people just like them, securely and easily right from within their normal daily workflow.”

Service Connect Community Console

While Service Connect Community gives users a chance to interact with their peers, it is also designed to help them get the most out of their ADP solutions. Learning about features they have never used or didn't know they had, and reading about best practices will give everyone an opportunity to gain more value from every solution. Dealership employees can work smarter by finding timely and useful information, like application usage examples, solution nuances and manufacturer–specific setup answers.

“I like Service Connect Community because it has allowed me to reach out to fellow ADP users and get some great feedback on issues, concerns and thoughts about ADP Dealer Services,” said Sydney Sparrow of Earnhardt Auto Group in Chandler, AZ. ”I also like that it's another outlet outside of ADP Support. It's important for dealerships to interact with each other to talk about ADP.”

ADP Dealer Services will continue to engage clients and users to gain valuable feedback on ways to make the community an ideal social setting for dealership employees. Users can also be confident that the forum is secure and can only be accessed by current ADP clients directly from their ADP DMS.

“Who better to help answer a question or share best practices than other ADP users who can share their knowledge, expertise and practical experiences,” said Heffern. ”As the dealership environment continues to change at a rapid pace, we are committed to continuing to provide tools and resources that enable them to do their jobs more easily — this user–to–user community is another example of that.”

About ADP
With more than $12 billion in revenues and 65 years of experience, ADP® (NASDAQ: ADP) serves approximately 637,000 clients in more than 125 countries. As one of the world's largest providers of business outsourcing and Human Capital Management solutions, ADP offers a wide range of human resource, payroll, talent management, tax and benefits administration solutions from a single source, and helps clients comply with regulatory and legislative changes, such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). ADP's easy–to–use solutions for employers provide superior value to companies of all types and sizes. ADP is also a leading provider of integrated computing solutions to auto, truck, motorcycle, marine, recreational vehicle, and heavy equipment dealers throughout the world. For more information about ADP, visit the company's Web site at www.ADP.com.

The ADP logo and ADP are registered trademarks of ADP, LLC. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Copyright © 2014 ADP, LLC.

Laws that Kill Protesters in Mexico

Students from the high school attended by José Luis Alberto Tehuatlie, during the boy’s Jul. 22 funeral in the town of San Bernardino Chalchihuapan, in the Mexican state of Puebla. Credit: Daniela Pastrana /IPS

Students from the high school attended by José Luis Alberto Tehuatlie, during the boy’s Jul. 22 funeral in the town of San Bernardino Chalchihuapan, in the Mexican state of Puebla. Credit: Daniela Pastrana /IPS

By Daniela Pastrana
SAN BERNARDINO CHALCHIHUAPAN, Mexico , Jul 31 2014 – People in this town in the central Mexican state of Puebla found out the hard way that protesting can be deadly.

A new law passed in Puebla makes it possible for police to use firearms or deadly force to break up demonstrations.

Local inhabitants felt the impact of the measure during a harsh crackdown on a protest against another law that they say undermines their autonomy.

A dead 13-year-old boy, another who lost three fingers, a third with a broken jaw and teeth knocked out, a driver who lost an eye, and 37 others injured by beatings and tear gas were the price this Nahua indigenous town of 3,900 people paid for blocking a road to demand the repeal of a state law that transferred responsibility over civil registries from local community authorities to the municipalities.

“It’s not fair that they attack the people like this just because we are asking that our community life, our authorities, be respected,” Vianey Varela, a first year high school student, told IPS.

On Jul. 9, when local residents blocked the Puebla-Atlixco highway some 150 km from Mexico City, the state police first used the powers given to them by the Law to Protect Human Rights and Regulate the Legitimate Use of Force by the police, which the state legislature passed in May.

The “Ley Bala” or Bullet Law, as it was dubbed by journalists, allows Puebla state police to use firearms as well as “non-lethal weapons” to break up “violent” protests and during emergencies and natural disasters.

The roadblock was mounted to protest another state law approved in May, which took away from the local authorities the function of civil registry judges or clerks and put it in the hands of the municipal governments.Since May, in at least 190 villages and towns in the state, no one has been born, no one has died, and no one has been married – at least officially, because there are no records.

As a result, since May, in at least 190 villages and towns in the state, no one has been born, no one has died, and no one has been married – at least officially, because there are no records.

Javier Montes told IPS that he became “presidente auxiliar”- a post just under mayor – of San Bernardino Chalchihuapan in May, but added that “I still haven’t signed a thing. The archives are in our care, but we don’t have stamps or the necessary papers. And in the municipal presidency [mayor’s office] they don’t know what to do, so in the meantime nothing is being registered.”

“We sent letters to all the authorities,” said Montes, who has received anonymous threats for speaking out. “They never responded. When the ink and paper ran out, and our fingers were worn out from so much typing, we went out to protest and this is what happened.”

The town is in the municipality of Ocoyucan and the local inhabitants belong to the Nahua indigenous community. According to the latest estimates by the government’s National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples, the native population of Puebla is one million people – one quarter of the state’s total population.

In Mexico’s municipalities there is a “presidente” or mayor, and “presidentes auxiliares”, who are the highest level authorities in the communities, many of which are remote and located far from the seat of the municipal government.

The presidentes auxiliares name the police chief and run the town. And up to May they were also the civil registry judges or clerks..

They are directly elected by local voters without participation by the political parties, and they tend to be highly respected local leaders who are close to the people.

In the Jul. 9 police crackdown, 13-year-old José Luis Alberto Tehuatlie was hit by a rubber bullet in the head and died after 10 days in coma.

The Puebla state government initially denied that rubber bullets had been used. But the public outrage over the boy’s death forced Governor Rafael Moreno to announce that he would repeal the law.

Puebla is not the only place in Mexico where there have been attempts to regulate public protests. In the last year, the legislatures of five states have discussed similar bills.

The first was, paradoxically, the Federal District, in Mexico City, which has been governed by the leftwing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) since 1997.

In the capital street protests are a daily occurrence, but since the very day that Enrique Peña Nieto was sworn in as president, on Dec. 1, 2012, demonstrations and marches have frequently turned violent.

A Federal District bill on public demonstrations, introduced in December 2013 by lawmakers from the rightwing opposition National Action Party, failed to prosper.

In April, the southeastern state of Quintana Roo, ruled by the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), became the first part of Mexico to regulate protests.

A state law, the “Ley de Ordenamiento Cívico”, known as the “anti-protest law,” is a toned-down version of another initiative that would have required demonstrators to apply for a permit to protest at least 48 hours ahead of time.

But the law maintains the ban on roadblocks and allows the police “to take pertinent measures” against demonstrators.

Other initiatives to regulate and allow the “legitimate use of force” have been adopted in the states of San Luis Potosí and Chiapas.

Global rights groups like Article 19 and Amnesty International have spoken out strongly against these laws aimed at regulating demonstrations, pointing to a worrisome tendency towards the criminalisation of social protests in Mexico since 2012.

But the governmental National Human Rights Commission has failed to make use of its legal powers to promote legal action challenging the anti-protest initiatives as unconstitutional.

On the contrary, in October 2013 it recommended that the Senate amend article 9 of the constitution referring to the freedom to hold public demonstrations and to the use of public force.

The Jul. 9 protest was not the first time rubber bullets have been used in Puebla.

Just hours before Tehuatlie’s death was confirmed, the Puebla state secretary of public security, Facundo Rosas, showed a document from the secretariat of national defence which indicated that the government had not purchased rubber bullets under the current administration.

However, in December 2011 the state human rights commission rebuked the Puebla police chief for the use of rubber bullets to evict local residents of the community of Ciénega Larga, when 70-year-old Artemia León was injured, as reported by the Eje Central online news site.

It became clear in conversations that IPS held with people in San Bernardino Chalchihuapan that they are very angry. Hundreds of people attended the boy’s funeral, on Jul. 22, where many of them called for the governor’s resignation.

“Why doesn’t he try the rubber bullets on his own kids,” said one man after the funeral, which was attended by some 40 “presidentes auxiliares” from other communities.

So far no one has been held accountable for the boy’s death.

Flipora: The Future of Content Discovery on the Web

SUNNYVALE, CA—(Marketwired – Jul 31, 2014) – Wouldn't it be nice to have a guide as you tour the vast stretches of content available on the Web? What if there was a way to personalize the way you experience the Web? Flipora offers a free service to do just that, which can easily be added on to your browser via a browser extension. It is a Pandora for websites. Using sophisticated machine learning algorithms that rely on analyzing web browsing data, Flipora automatically builds an interest profile for a user and makes great content recommendations based on that.

Flipora 2.0, launched only a month ago, provides a personalized experience that goes even further than its predecessor. There is a vast selection of interests to follow on Flipora and in the new version users are automatically made to follow interests based on their web browsing history. This is in contrast with most alternative services that require a lot of manual effort by the user to “train” the algorithm so it works well and shows relevant results. Relying on web browsing data also ensures the service is able to keep up with a user's evolving interests. Flipora can infer that out of hundreds of interests that a user might have, in the last week she is most interested in say 5 topics. The user interface is clean, clutter free and shows only what is necessary. Unlike Facebook and other social media platforms, Flipora does not clutter your screen with what your friends are doing and what they might be interested in. Flipora is about you. You can imagine yourself building a relationship with a machine. As the relationship continues, both machine and user learn more about each other, allowing even further synchronization of interests and recommendations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBEhd7BWPHA&list=UUQkoXaFBn19zFUOs54PCKtQ

Currently, Flipora's recommendation engine supports around 3000 interests for people to follow. But in the near future, the company has hinted at further expanding this pool of interests and also supporting custom, user created interests. A mobile app for iOS is also slated for release later this year.

Another unique aspect of Flipora is that it is mood–aware. This means that it can immediately adjust to your current state of mind. No one wants to see recommendations based on what was interesting to them a week ago, but often times social media still clutters feeds with what was liked or shared years ago. Using data from web browsing history, Flipora automatically filters out old interests and keeps the emphasis on what's current and top of mind for a user. The “slider”, which is a cool feature of the browser extension, shows you a great website recommendation related to the page you are on currently.

With 30 million users and growing fast, Flipora is set to revolutionize the way we discover the Web. Let the next era of intelligent personalization on the Web begin!

About Flipora:
Flipora is an A.I. based content discovery service that automatically learns your interests and then recommends content to you based on what you are currently in the mood for. Today, content discovery is broken and left to chance on Facebook and Twitter. Facebook and Twitter don't know what you are currently in the mood for, and so you largely see boring and generic content, driven by what your friends want to share and not what you want to see. Flipora puts the emphasis on you and what you are in the mood for right now and recommends content based on your current interests. Flipora is the world's first mood–aware content discovery service.

Starting out of Stanford University, Flipora.com now has nearly 30 million users and has raised Venture Capital from some of the best investors in Silicon Valley, with prior successes such as PayPal, Twitter, Skype, Tesla, Baidu, and Hotmail.

For more information about Flipora, visit: http://www.fliporareviews.com/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flipora

Twitter: http://twitter.com/flipora