Hitachi Energy achieves 100% fossil free electricity in own operations

Zurich, Switzerland, Jan. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hitachi Energy today announced that it has achieved the first–step target set out in its Sustainability 2030 plan "" the use of 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations(1*). The company is driving towards being carbon–neutral in its own operations by 2030(2**), in line with its Purpose, "Advancing a sustainable energy future for all'.

"By achieving 100% fossil–free electricity in our own operations, we have reduced our CO2 equivalent emissions by over 50% compared to 2019," says Claudio Facchin, CEO of Hitachi Energy. He continued, "The Net Zero challenge is global and it's about acting now, innovating and collaborating across countries, industries and societies. Together with customers, partners, and all stakeholders, we are advancing the world's energy system to be more sustainable, flexible and secure."

The targeted 50% reduction achieved ahead of plan will amount to approximately 175 kilo tonnes of CO2e per year, equivalent to removing over 35,000 passenger cars off the road.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations "" and in support of the Hitachi Group's carbon–neutrality goal(3***) "" the company has pursued a number of pathways including supporting projects to generate its own fossil–free electricity, such as installing solar roof panels combined with e–meshTM digital solutions for distributed energy resources maximizing energy efficiency and minimizing CO2 emissions. In its Zhongshan factory in China, the company is generating nearly 20% of its total energy consumption from solar panels. In its first year of operation, the power generated at the factory is expected to reach 1,510 megawatt hours (MWh), contributing to the reduction in annual carbon emissions by more than 1,000 tonnes.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity, Hitachi Energy has also switched to green tariffs, bought Energy Attribute Certificates (EACs), and signed Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) across its operations and facilities in 90 countries.

Looking ahead, Hitachi Energy is continuing to invest in its journey towards carbon–neutrality by further increasing energy efficiency, as well as electrifying its own operations. In Ludvika, Sweden, the company is now using 100% renewable electricity generated from hydropower and from solar panels to support its operations. Ludvika, which is one of Hitachi Energy's largest production facilities, has gone beyond tackling its electricity supply and is now close to removing the use of all fossil fuels from the whole of its operations.

The company has a track record of implementing its own technologies in its operations to enable the integration of renewable energy. For example, in 2015 its South Africa operations installed a 750 kW rooftop photovoltaic plant and a 1 MVA/380 kWh battery–based PowerStoreTM for enhancing the use of renewables and providing a continuous supply of power.

Through its Sustainability 2030 plan and targets, the company reinforces its commitment to accelerating actions driving business in a sustainable way. Based around four pillars "" Planet, People, Peace, and Partnerships "" the strategy draws from the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with specific focus on the following eight: 3 (Good health and well–being), 4 (Quality education), 5 (Gender equality), 6 (Clean water and sanitation), 7 (Affordable and clean energy), 12 (Responsible consumption and production), 16 (Peace, justice and strong institutions); and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals). In line with these SDGs, each pillar has corresponding targets that drive the business to contribute social, environmental, and economic value.

Notes
(1*) The contract for its South Korea operations (equivalent to 0.4% total electricity usage) is expected to be signed in February 2022 retrospectively through green tariffs.

(2**) Discover more about Hitachi Energy's approach to Sustainability 2030 here

(3*** ) Hitachi Sustainability Report 2021

About Hitachi Energy Ltd.

Hitachi Energy is a global technology leader that is advancing a sustainable energy future for all. We serve customers in the utility, industry and infrastructure sectors with innovative solutions and services across the value chain. Together with customers and partners, we pioneer technologies and enable the digital transformation required to accelerate the energy transition towards a carbon–neutral future. We are advancing the world's energy system to become more sustainable, flexible and secure whilst balancing social, environmental and economic value. Hitachi Energy has a proven track record and unparalleled installed base in more than 140 countries. Headquartered in Switzerland, we employ around 38,000 people in 90 countries and generate business volumes of approximately $10 billion USD.

About Hitachi, Ltd.

Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, contributes to a sustainable society with a higher quality of life by driving innovation through data and technology as the Social Innovation Business. Hitachi is focused on strengthening its contribution to the Environment, the Resilience of business and social infrastructure as well as comprehensive programs to enhance Security & Safety. Hitachi resolves the issues faced by customers and society across six domains: IT, Energy, Mobility, Industry, Smart Life and Automotive Systems through its proprietary Lumada solutions. The company's consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2020 (ended March 31, 2021) totaled 8,729.1 billion yen ($78.6 billion), with 871 consolidated subsidiaries and approximately 350,000 employees worldwide. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's website at https://www.hitachi.com.

Attachment


Hitachi Energy achieves 100% fossil free electricity in own operations

Zurich, Switzerland, Jan. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hitachi Energy today announced that it has achieved the first–step target set out in its Sustainability 2030 plan "" the use of 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations(1*). The company is driving towards being carbon–neutral in its own operations by 2030(2**), in line with its Purpose, "Advancing a sustainable energy future for all'.

"By achieving 100% fossil–free electricity in our own operations, we have reduced our CO2 equivalent emissions by over 50% compared to 2019," says Claudio Facchin, CEO of Hitachi Energy. He continued, "The Net Zero challenge is global and it's about acting now, innovating and collaborating across countries, industries and societies. Together with customers, partners, and all stakeholders, we are advancing the world's energy system to be more sustainable, flexible and secure."

The targeted 50% reduction achieved ahead of plan will amount to approximately 175 kilo tonnes of CO2e per year, equivalent to removing over 35,000 passenger cars off the road.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations "" and in support of the Hitachi Group's carbon–neutrality goal(3***) "" the company has pursued a number of pathways including supporting projects to generate its own fossil–free electricity, such as installing solar roof panels combined with e–meshTM digital solutions for distributed energy resources maximizing energy efficiency and minimizing CO2 emissions. In its Zhongshan factory in China, the company is generating nearly 20% of its total energy consumption from solar panels. In its first year of operation, the power generated at the factory is expected to reach 1,510 megawatt hours (MWh), contributing to the reduction in annual carbon emissions by more than 1,000 tonnes.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity, Hitachi Energy has also switched to green tariffs, bought Energy Attribute Certificates (EACs), and signed Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) across its operations and facilities in 90 countries.

Looking ahead, Hitachi Energy is continuing to invest in its journey towards carbon–neutrality by further increasing energy efficiency, as well as electrifying its own operations. In Ludvika, Sweden, the company is now using 100% renewable electricity generated from hydropower and from solar panels to support its operations. Ludvika, which is one of Hitachi Energy's largest production facilities, has gone beyond tackling its electricity supply and is now close to removing the use of all fossil fuels from the whole of its operations.

The company has a track record of implementing its own technologies in its operations to enable the integration of renewable energy. For example, in 2015 its South Africa operations installed a 750 kW rooftop photovoltaic plant and a 1 MVA/380 kWh battery–based PowerStoreTM for enhancing the use of renewables and providing a continuous supply of power.

Through its Sustainability 2030 plan and targets, the company reinforces its commitment to accelerating actions driving business in a sustainable way. Based around four pillars "" Planet, People, Peace, and Partnerships "" the strategy draws from the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with specific focus on the following eight: 3 (Good health and well–being), 4 (Quality education), 5 (Gender equality), 6 (Clean water and sanitation), 7 (Affordable and clean energy), 12 (Responsible consumption and production), 16 (Peace, justice and strong institutions); and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals). In line with these SDGs, each pillar has corresponding targets that drive the business to contribute social, environmental, and economic value.

Notes
(1*) The contract for its South Korea operations (equivalent to 0.4% total electricity usage) is expected to be signed in February 2022 retrospectively through green tariffs.

(2**) Discover more about Hitachi Energy's approach to Sustainability 2030 here

(3*** ) Hitachi Sustainability Report 2021

About Hitachi Energy Ltd.

Hitachi Energy is a global technology leader that is advancing a sustainable energy future for all. We serve customers in the utility, industry and infrastructure sectors with innovative solutions and services across the value chain. Together with customers and partners, we pioneer technologies and enable the digital transformation required to accelerate the energy transition towards a carbon–neutral future. We are advancing the world's energy system to become more sustainable, flexible and secure whilst balancing social, environmental and economic value. Hitachi Energy has a proven track record and unparalleled installed base in more than 140 countries. Headquartered in Switzerland, we employ around 38,000 people in 90 countries and generate business volumes of approximately $10 billion USD.

About Hitachi, Ltd.

Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, contributes to a sustainable society with a higher quality of life by driving innovation through data and technology as the Social Innovation Business. Hitachi is focused on strengthening its contribution to the Environment, the Resilience of business and social infrastructure as well as comprehensive programs to enhance Security & Safety. Hitachi resolves the issues faced by customers and society across six domains: IT, Energy, Mobility, Industry, Smart Life and Automotive Systems through its proprietary Lumada solutions. The company's consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2020 (ended March 31, 2021) totaled 8,729.1 billion yen ($78.6 billion), with 871 consolidated subsidiaries and approximately 350,000 employees worldwide. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's website at https://www.hitachi.com.

Attachment


BigPanda Announces Global Expansion and Midsize Enterprise Presence Fueled by Explosive Demand for AIOps

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — BigPanda, Inc., the leader in AIOps Event Correlation and Automation, today announced the company has opened an office in London, led by Ben Sekhon, to provide on–the–ground support for both existing and new customers across the EMEA region. In addition, BigPanda has created a business unit dedicated to helping address needs from midsize enterprises to scale IT with AIOps.

Intensified Support in EMEA
The EMEA market is on par with the U.S. in terms of AIOps demand, particularly as customers move away from aging on–premises infrastructure towards cloud and cloud–native environments. The business will be led by Ben Sekhon, a 20–year sales veteran who had a successful track record at SAP, Gigya and Experian.

"I am delighted to join BigPanda," said Ben Sekhon, VP of EMEA Sales and Channels. "EMEA represents a huge addressable market, so the timing of this investment helps us maintain the same level of focus and quality we deliver to our existing customers while addressing the growing demand for BigPanda's market–leading AIOps platform."

"We're very excited to welcome BigPanda to Europe to further build on our relationship and the high level of support the team has already provided," said Harvey Shaw, Senior IT Director at News Corp. "The company has proven to be a vital partner, and we're confident that its on–the–ground presence will help us accelerate our AIOps strategy."

EU Region Platform Availability
To support BigPanda's EMEA customers, BigPanda is also expanding its platform availability with an instance hosted in Germany. This BigPanda instance will conform to leading international security and privacy standards and address European data residency requirements to store customer data in Europe.

Addressing Demand in Midsize Enterprises
Over the course of several years, BigPanda has built a base of midsize enterprise customers. With the launch of BigPanda University and the continued focus on self–service capabilities within the BigPanda platform, the team is poised to expand its ability to deliver AIOps to the midsize enterprise.

“While a focus for most IT Ops vendors is the largest of enterprises, the reality is that midsize enterprises also need to improve app experiences by scaling through technology, making AIOps a foundational element of their roadmap," said Isaac Sacolick, President of StarCIO, author, and digital transformation influencer. "In recent research, 70 percent report it typically takes three hours or longer to resolve major incidents, and the right solution leverages AIOps to improve IT performance. BigPanda is putting its energy in all the right places to serve this market segment well."

BigPanda's AIOps Turbo Pack is a customized offering that gives IT Ops teams within midsize organizations a quick path to success. It includes flexible, tiered, consumption–based licensing along with a standard set of integrations and implementation services to get them up and running in a matter of weeks. To learn more about the AIOps Turbo Pack for fast–growing IT Ops, please visit BigPanda for Midsize enterprises.

About BigPanda

BigPanda keeps businesses running with AIOps that transform IT data into insight and action. With BigPanda's AIOps platform, businesses prevent IT outages, improve incident management and deliver extraordinary customer experiences. Without BigPanda, IT Ops, NOC, and DevOps teams struggle with a tsunami of data and highly–manual, reactive incident response processes that are poorly suited for the scale, complexity and velocity of modern IT environments. This results in painful outages, unhappy customers, growing IT headcount and the inability to focus on innovation.

BigPanda's AIOps Event Correlation and Automation platform helps Fortune 500 enterprises such as Intel, Cisco, United, Abbott, Marriott and Expedia take a giant step towards Autonomous IT Operations. BigPanda is backed by Advent International, Insight Partners, Sequoia Capital, Mayfield, Battery Ventures, Glynn Capital, Mayfield, Greenfield Partners and Pelion. Visit www.bigpanda.io for more information.

Media contact:
Sammy Totah
BOCA Communications for BigPanda
bigpanda@bocacommunications.com


A Special Adviser to Probe Racism and Discrimination at UN

UN staff in New York. Credit: United Nations

By Thalif Deen
UNITED NATIONS, Jan 27 2022 – “Racism and discrimination have no place in our world — least of all at the United Nations”, warns UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who will soon appoint a Special Adviser to investigate the growing discrimination based on racial, national or ethnic origins in the world body.

“The diversity of our personnel is a source of profound richness. Yet I am fully aware and deeply concerned that colleagues have experienced the indignity, pain and consequences of workplace racism and racial discrimination. This is unacceptable,” says Guterres in a message to UN staffers January 25.

He has also pledged to establish a Steering Group to oversee implementation of the Strategic Action Plan on racial discrimination —and report progress to the Executive and Management Committees.

“These are the first steps in a relentless effort to address issues which tarnish the Organization’s core values and behaviours and demean our shared humanity”.

“With your support, we will build a culture of solidarity and anti-racism where every individual can bring their whole self to work in a safe environment, regardless of racial, national, or ethnic origin. This is the most effective way to transform the lives of the people we serve through enhanced professionalism, equality, dignity, and the promotion of racial diversity”, he implored.

According to his annual report submitted to the UN’s Administrative and Budgetary Committee last month the United Nations currently has more than 36,000 staffers in 463 duty stations world-wide.

“The work of the United Nations Secretariat is underpinned by the effective management of finance, human resources, information and communications technology, supply chains, facilities, conference services and security and safety operations, as well as communicating the work of the Organization to global audiences,” the report said.

A protest by UN staff in Geneva. Credit: United Nations

Asked for his comments, Aitor Arauz, President of the UN Staff Union (UNSU) and General Secretary of the UN International Civil Servants Federation (UNISERV), told IPS the publication of the SG’s Strategic Action Plan (SAP) is the culmination of a process of collective introspection, truth-telling and resolve to change that stemmed from a momentous town hall meeting convened by the New York Staff Union in June 2020, at the height of the global movement for racial justice.

“We praise the bravery of the colleagues who raised their voices to denounce the discrimination they experience in the workplace and to say, “Enough! The UN needs to do better.”

The Secretary-General listened, responded with determination, and “we could not be prouder to see how far the process has come since then”.

The inclusive consultations that fed into the SAP, Arauz said, provide solid guarantees of the UN staff community’s buy-in and support. The staff unions are ready to mobilise volunteers and ideas, but staff’s commitment must be matched with resources and political drive from senior leadership, he noted.

“A plan remains just a plan until it is realised… the work to meet our ambitious commitments starts now,” he declared.

Samir Sanbar, a former UN Assistant Secretary-General and head of the Department of Public Information (now re-christened Department of Global Communications) told IPS obviously racism and discrimination have no place in the United Nations.

“It is an integral requirement—almost an oath of office— and inherent in the spirit of the U.N. Charter”.

Since its establishment, most U.N. staff dedicated their careers and often risked their lives in areas of conflict to uphold human dignity and confront racism and discrimination, he pointed out.

A declaration to appoint “a Special Adviser and establish a Steering group to report to the Executive Management Committee” reflects a need to deal with a disappointing erosion of U.N .principles.

It seems to entail various appointments-including for aspiring diplomats and require some time to meet review, report and implement.

The Secretary-General, he said, must have perceived a certain requirement to declare the decision

“Clearly, in a changing world and shifting times, the UN and its role has changed. Yet its inclusive global framework and human objectives remain” declared Sanbar, who had served under five different secretaries-generals.

Meanwhile, a survey of over 688 UN staffers in Geneva in 2020 came up with some startling revelations re-affirming the fact, which has long remained under wraps, that “racism exists within the United Nations”.

The survey revealed that “more than one in three staff have personally experienced racial discrimination and/or have witnessed others facing racial discrimination in the workplace. And two-thirds of those who experienced racism did so on the basis of nationality”.

A separate survey by the UN Staff Union in New York was equally revealing.

According to the findings, 59% of the respondents said “they don’t feel the UN effectively addresses racial justice in the workplace, while every second respondent noted they don’t feel comfortable talking about racial discrimination at work”.

Meanwhile, the UN Secretariat in New York, faltered ingloriously, as it abruptly withdrew its own online survey on racism, in which it asked staffers to identify themselves either as “black, brown, white., mixed/multi-racial, and any other”.

But the most offensive of the categories listed in the survey was “yellow” – a longstanding Western racist description of Asians, including Japanese, Chinese and Koreans.

A non-apologetic message emailed to staffers read: “The United Nations Survey on Racism has been taken offline and will be revised and reissued, taking into account the legitimate concerns expressed by staff.”

The findings of the Geneva survey also revealed:

1. Among those who experienced or witnessed racism, a majority of staff indicated that racial discrimination affected opportunities for career advancement. A significant number of staff also indicated that racial discrimination manifested itself in the form of verbal abuse and exclusion from work events, such as decision-making, trainings, missions, assignments etc.

2. A large number who experienced or witnessed racial discrimination, harassment or abuse of authority indicated that they did not take any action. Lack of trust in the organization’s recourse mechanisms was cited as the most common reason. Many also stated that that they feared retaliation.

3. Respondents believed racism needed to be addressed in a number of different ways. These include accountability and zero tolerance, training and sensitization, greater transparency in hiring, broader diversity, and a more open dialogue on the issue.

In his message to staffers, Guterres also said: “I am committed to ensuring that our Secretariat benefits from the diverse perspectives, skill sets, and lived experiences of all our personnel. Addressing racism and racial discrimination is central to that effort. This will require robust investigative and accountability measures, coupled with persistence and sustained collective actions to enhance support and build trust.

In that spirit, “we launched an Organization-wide discussion on racism in our workplace in October 2020 under the leadership of the Task Force on Addressing Racism and Promoting Dignity for All. Today, I am pleased to share the Strategic Action Plan developed by the Task Force.”

The Plan outlines concrete actions to tackle racism in the workplace through accountability. It includes immediate actions to:

    (a) review past allegations of racism, derive lessons learned, address retaliation and provide context for the consideration of future cases;
    (b) institutionalize the Racial Justice Focal Point Volunteer Network at all duty stations, giving the network management backing to support staff;
    (c) provide personnel with clear information on how to report complaints; and
    (d) continue dialogue and raise awareness to ensure a common understanding of racism and its manifestations at our workplaces around the world.

“I look forward to working with you in ensuring an inclusive and diverse workforce where everyone is respected and feels recognized and valued,” Guterres said.

 


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Road to COP27: Why Africa cannot be Complacent on Energy, Climate Change

Africa’s Practical Realities on Energy and Climate Change. Credit: United Nations

By Bitsat Yohannes-Kassahun
UNITED NATIONS, Jan 27 2022 – A year ago, we welcomed 2021 with a sense of cautious optimism when the newly developed vaccines promised a shift in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. The focus turned towards building back better and doing things differently as many countries started to rethink and rebuild their shattered economies.

For African countries, however, the pandemic exposed the stark realities of global inequality. These countries scrambled to buttress their shattered food systems; they lacked industries to shift production to life-saving personal protection equipment even as young Africans were left out of schools because of lack of access to electricity and the internet, which made the shift to virtual learning almost impossible.

The pandemic revealed how Africa, despite its best efforts, was unprepared for some of the pressing emergencies of our times, be it the pandemic or the looming threat of climate change.

The UN Office of the Special Adviser for Africa is advocating for Africa to transition into 2022 with a sense of utmost urgency in building the continent’s resilience. We firmly believe that the foundational building blocks to this resilience lie in Africans’ access to reliable, affordable and sustainable energy.

For over a decade, the United Nations has touted energy as “The golden thread that connects economic growth, social equity, and environmental sustainability” to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Energy is the key to unlocking Africa’s future envisioned in the African Union’s Agenda 2063.

Whether it is for economic transformation, ensuring food security, digitalizing education, revolutionizing health systems, building manufacturing and industrialization capacities, or sustaining peace by creating quality jobs and delivering services, no country in the world has achieved these ambitions without abundant and affordable access to energy.

Bitsat Yohannes-Kassahun is the Programme Management Officer at the UN Office of the Special Adviser for Africa.

Access to energy will make or break the continent’s effort to tackle climate change effects, including adverse weather events, water scarcity and significant threats to livelihoods.

However, Africans are getting the short end of the stick in the global race to combat climate change when it comes to energy.

First, the promised financing to invest in reliable energy systems and adaptation is trickling very slowly to where it is needed most.

Second, Africa could be handicapped if the global-level policies designed to limit greenhouse gas emissions and the proposed timelines toward net-zero emissions do not take the continent’s unique and nuanced circumstances into account.

Looking ahead at what 2022 holds for Africa’s quest for equitable energy access, it would be remiss not to reflect on three major events that took place in 2021 namely, the High-Level Dialogue on Energy (HLDE), the Food Systems Summit and the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 26).

Among other factors, energy remains vital to the full implementation of promises made at these events. In the roadmap that ensued after the HLDE, UN Secretary-General António Guterres set a target date of 2025 to ensure 500 million more people gain access to electricity and 1 billion more people gain access to clean cooking solutions.

The Food Systems Summit called for a transformation in global food systems “in ways that contribute to people’s nutrition, health and well-being, restore and protect nature, are climate neutral, adapted to local circumstances, and provide decent jobs and inclusive economies.”

The COP 26 outcome document calls for bold and strengthened goals by countries to reduce emissions through more ambitious Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) for COP 27.

What do these mean for African countries? These ambitious proposals require massive investments in capacity building, infrastructure development and regulations. Indeed, the amounts needed are much more than anything currently on the table.

While significant financial pledges have been made at these summits, African countries are wary of them being fulfilled, and rightfully so. Developed countries are still “progressing” towards delivering the $100 billion by 2020 climate finance goal (a broken promise) and now hope to reach it by 2023.

Added to previous failed promises, trust has further been eroded with a significantly varied and unequal pace of recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic evidenced, for example, in the mismatch between promised COVID-19 vaccine distribution pledges versus what has been delivered for African countries.

There are increasing calls for the private sector to fill these financing gaps. However, the private sector inherently operates on a profit-making model that differs from the public good model expected of the public sector. It requires tailored incentives, foolproof technologies that can guarantee certain profit margins, and risk minimization models for the sector to come in at a large enough scale.

In addition, the nuanced approach and extended timelines needed for Africa to achieve a balanced energy mix are getting lost in the shuffle. African countries should not be confined to limited options or cornered into untenable paths to energy access, especially with the call for public finance institutions to stop international support for the unabated fossil fuel energy sector in 2022.

The stakes are high for Africa to get it right, hence this urgent call to action towards building the continent’s energy systems. Energy presents a compelling multiplier effect for Africa’s renaissance. It is the cornerstone to ensuring food security by improving efficiency in food production, storage, transportation, and job creation through value addition.

Reductions in post-harvest losses, combined with improved cooking solutions, would have an added benefit of minimizing deforestation. Africa’s industrial revolution and achieving the African Continental Free Trade Area’s potential hinge on access to reliable, affordable, and adequate energy.

Finally, energy access is among the major building blocks to deliver services, adapt to climate risks and provide sustainable livelihoods, ensuring the continent’s peace, security and development for the next generation.

As we prepare for COP 27, we cannot be complacent. We must jointly advocate for Africa’s equitable future through a balanced energy mix and realistic timelines. We owe it to all Africans—past, present and future—to move beyond negotiating for the bare minimum.

Source: Africa Renewal, January 2022

 


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Hitachi Energy achieves 100% fossil free electricity in own operations

Zurich, Switzerland, Jan. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hitachi Energy today announced that it has achieved the first–step target set out in its Sustainability 2030 plan "" the use of 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations1. The company is driving towards being carbon–neutral in its own operations by 20302, in line with its Purpose, "Advancing a sustainable energy future for all'.

"By achieving 100% fossil–free electricity in our own operations, we have reduced our CO2 equivalent emissions by over 50% compared to 2019," says Claudio Facchin, CEO of Hitachi Energy. He continued, "The Net Zero challenge is global and it's about acting now, innovating and collaborating across countries, industries and societies. Together with customers, partners, and all stakeholders, we are advancing the world's energy system to be more sustainable, flexible and secure."

The targeted 50% reduction achieved ahead of plan will amount to approximately 175 kilo tonnes of CO2e per year, equivalent to removing over 35,000 passenger cars off the road.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity in its own operations "" and in support of the Hitachi Group's carbon–neutrality goal3 "" the company has pursued a number of pathways including supporting projects to generate its own fossil–free electricity, such as installing solar roof panels combined with e–meshTM digital solutions for distributed energy resources maximizing energy efficiency and minimizing CO2 emissions. In its Zhongshan factory in China, the company is generating nearly 20% of its total energy consumption from solar panels. In its first year of operation, the power generated at the factory is expected to reach 1,510 megawatt hours (MWh), contributing to the reduction in annual carbon emissions by more than 1,000 tonnes.

To achieve 100% fossil–free electricity, Hitachi Energy has also switched to green tariffs, bought Energy Attribute Certificates (EACs), and signed Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) across its operations and facilities in 90 countries.

Looking ahead, Hitachi Energy is continuing to invest in its journey towards carbon–neutrality by further increasing energy efficiency, as well as electrifying its own operations. In Ludvika, Sweden, the company is now using 100% renewable electricity generated from hydropower and from solar panels to support its operations. Ludvika, which is one of Hitachi Energy's largest production facilities, has gone beyond tackling its electricity supply and is now close to removing the use of all fossil fuels from the whole of its operations.

The company has a track record of implementing its own technologies in its operations to enable the integration of renewable energy. For example, in 2015 its South Africa operations installed a 750 kW rooftop photovoltaic plant and a 1 MVA/380 kWh battery–based PowerStoreTM for enhancing the use of renewables and providing a continuous supply of power.

Through its Sustainability 2030 plan and targets, the company reinforces its commitment to accelerating actions driving business in a sustainable way. Based around four pillars "" Planet, People, Peace, and Partnerships "" the strategy draws from the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with specific focus on the following eight: 3 (Good health and well–being), 4 (Quality education), 5 (Gender equality), 6 (Clean water and sanitation), 7 (Affordable and clean energy), 12 (Responsible consumption and production), 16 (Peace, justice and strong institutions); and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals). In line with these SDGs, each pillar has corresponding targets that drive the business to contribute social, environmental, and economic value.

Notes
1. The contract for its South Korea operations (equivalent to 0.4% total electricity usage) is expected to be signed in February 2022 retrospectively through green tariffs.

2. Discover more about Hitachi Energy's approach to Sustainability 2030 here

3. Hitachi Sustainability Report 2021

About Hitachi Energy Ltd.

Hitachi Energy is a global technology leader that is advancing a sustainable energy future for all. We serve customers in the utility, industry and infrastructure sectors with innovative solutions and services across the value chain. Together with customers and partners, we pioneer technologies and enable the digital transformation required to accelerate the energy transition towards a carbon–neutral future. We are advancing the world's energy system to become more sustainable, flexible and secure whilst balancing social, environmental and economic value. Hitachi Energy has a proven track record and unparalleled installed base in more than 140 countries. Headquartered in Switzerland, we employ around 38,000 people in 90 countries and generate business volumes of approximately $10 billion USD.

About Hitachi, Ltd.

Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, contributes to a sustainable society with a higher quality of life by driving innovation through data and technology as the Social Innovation Business. Hitachi is focused on strengthening its contribution to the Environment, the Resilience of business and social infrastructure as well as comprehensive programs to enhance Security & Safety. Hitachi resolves the issues faced by customers and society across six domains: IT, Energy, Mobility, Industry, Smart Life and Automotive Systems through its proprietary Lumada solutions. The company's consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2020 (ended March 31, 2021) totaled 8,729.1 billion yen ($78.6 billion), with 871 consolidated subsidiaries and approximately 350,000 employees worldwide. For more information on Hitachi, please visit the company's website at https://www.hitachi.com.

Attachment


Versius introduced in leading public hospitals in Egypt

Versius introduced in leading public hospitals in Egypt

  • Renowned teaching hospital, Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital, was the first hospital to introduce Versius
  • Demand for Versius continues to grow across MEA with rapidly expanding caseloads across a range of surgical specialties

Cambridge, United Kingdom. 27 January 2022 00:01 (GMT). CMR Surgical "" the global surgical robotics business "" has today announced the launch of its Versius Surgical Robotic System in Egypt. Versius has been introduced at both Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital and the International Hospital for Urology & Nephrology (IHUN), as CMR works with ATG group to meet significant demand for Versius from one of the largest countries in the Middle East and Africa (MEA) region. Versius is being used to perform a range of high–volume general surgery and urological procedures, helping to treat patients with colorectal and urological cancers, bowel and kidney disease.

High tech surgical care is highly prominent in the health system in Egypt, with adoption of the latest technology for RAS growing rapidly in Ministry of Health supported public hospitals in Egypt, such as Ain Shams. Ain Shams is one of the largest teaching hospitals in Africa and the Middle East and has a strong reputation globally as a research centre and training institute. The hospital was the first in Egypt to adopt Versius, where it is being used for a range of general and urological surgical procedures. At IHUN, Versius has been used in urological surgery. Using robotic keyhole surgery in these cases may reduce recovery time for a patient when compared to open surgery and can significantly reduce physical strain of operating for the surgeon.

Mark Slack, Chief Medical Officer of CMR Surgical said: "There is huge potential for surgical robotics in Egypt, a healthcare system that is renowned for clinical and academic excellence. The adoption of Versius by Ain Shams, one of the largest public teaching hospitals, and IHUN, a dedicated urological centre, is just the beginning. The diversity of procedures being completed across both Ain Shams and IHUN is a testament to the versatility of Versius. It is encouraging to see that in the short time that they have been using Versius, they have been able to complete a high–volume of procedures primarily treating a range of cancers, cementing the value Versius can offer healthcare systems globally."

Dr Tarek Youssef, Senior General & Colorectal Surgeon at Ain Shams University Hospital said: "Due to its size and modular design, we have easily been able to incorporate Versius into our busy clinical practice, performing complex surgeries that would otherwise have had to be performed using open surgery. Versius provides advantages in terms of increased accuracy and dexterity, both crucial assets in oncologic surgery, whilst also providing significant benefits to patients. We are delighted to be an innovator in Egypt as the first to use Versius and look forward to providing more patients with robotic surgery in the future."

The news of Versius launching in Egypt follows the recent successful introductions of the system in Pakistan and in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where CMR have recently opened a hub to support the UAE region. Versius is now being used across the Middle East, Europe, India and Australia to perform surgical procedures across a range of specialities including gynaecology, colorectal surgery, thoracic surgery general surgery and urology.

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Notes to editors:

The Versius Surgical Robotic System

Versius resets expectations of robotic surgery. Versius fits into virtually any operating room set–up and integrates seamlessly into existing workflows, increasing the likelihood of robotic minimal access surgery (MAS). The small, portable and modular design of Versius allows the surgeon to only use the number of arms needed for a given procedure.

Biomimicking the human arm, Versius gives surgeons the choice of optimised port placement alongside the dexterity and accuracy of small fully–wristed instruments. With 3D HD vision, easy–to adopt instrument control and a choice of ergonomic working positions, the open surgeon console has the potential to reduce stress and fatigue and allows for clear communication with the surgical team. By thinking laparoscopically and operating robotically with Versius, patients, surgeons and healthcare professionals can all benefit from the value that robotic MAS brings.

But it's more than just a robot. Versius captures meaningful data with its wider digital ecosystem to support a surgeon's continuous learning. Through the Versius Connect app, Versius Trainer and CMR clinical registry, Versius unleashes a wealth of insights to ultimately improve surgical care.

About CMR Surgical Limited

CMR Surgical (CMR) is a global medical devices company dedicated to transforming surgery with Versius , a next–generation surgical robot.

Headquartered in Cambridge, United Kingdom, CMR is committed to working with surgeons, surgical teams and hospital partners, to provide an optimal tool to make robotic minimal access surgery universally accessible and affordable. With Versius, we are on a mission to redefine the surgical robotics market with practical, innovative technology and data that can improve surgical care.

Founded in 2014, CMR Surgical is private limited company backed by an international shareholder base.