BD3 CCS Facility Reaches 4 Million Tonne Milestone

The following commentary by Brent Jacobs, P.Eng. is a statement on behalf of the International CCS Knowledge Centre.

It takes courage to be first. And now with SaskPower's ground–breaking Boundary Dam 3 CCS Facility (BD3) having captured and prevented four million tonnes (4Mt) of CO2 from entering the atmosphere, it is a milestone worth celebrating.

REGINA, Saskatchewan, March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — This amount of carbon mitigation not only has the equivalent emissions impact of taking approximately 865,000 cars off the road for a yeari, but it also underscores the value and large–scale impact of being tenacious in application–based learning and advancements.

I have the privilege of being part of the team at the International CCS Knowledge Centre (Knowledge Centre) where we work to advance the use of large–scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of greatly reducing global greenhouse gasses. What is particularly unique about this work is that we do this by sharing our experience and acquired knowledge from progressing along the learning curve. It's our aim to ensure that others have assurance of expertise; a strong and reliable basis of know how before they start.

The CCS story at BD3 is one of significant progress and inspiration for future CCS initiatives. BD3's carbon capture performance continues to improve and demonstrate the real–world application of CCS to substantially reduce emissions in the energy and industry sectors.

With the experience gained through the design, construction, operation, and subsequent improvements of the BD3 CCS Facility, the Knowledge Centre developed two major studies that continue to be at the forefront of post–combustion capture processes globally. The Shand CCS Feasibility Study (Shand Study, Nov.2018), shows major improvements in CCS project costs, risks, and efficiencies, and provides the foundation for the Lehigh CCS Feasibility Study, (anticipated in the autumn 2021), which directly applies these advancements to the cement sector.

Our analysis of daily operational data from the BD3 CCS facility, from the time it began capture operations in October of 2014, were recently shared on the world stage at the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme GHGT–15 conference in March 2021.ii The results are more than promising.

As with most "first of a kind" facilities, unforeseen barriers can be expected to impact performance. These real application–based studies address specific challenges experienced with the capture system at BD3 CCS Facility and the corrective actions taken to improve its performance, reliability, and availability. These corrective actions are directly transferable to the next installations of CCS.

It's encouraging to see steady improvement of operations over such a short trajectory of time. CCS is a viable and essential option for industries to mitigate their CO2 emissions and we must apply the value from BD3 learnings and use this know–how to identify and eliminate existing barriers that are key to achieving and maintaining optimal performance.

Performance evaluation is essential as CCS technologies seek increased deployment across sectors. With each year, optimization of the BD3 CCS Facility continues to help refine improvements in efficiency and cost effectiveness. These enhancements in performance yield a stronger foundation for next out–the–gate projects by ensuring reductions in project costs and risks as well increasing operational predictability and certainty.

BD3 CCS Facility, with its courage to be first, has paved the way for significant capital and operating cost reductions paired with increased efficiencies to further improve the next generation of CCS installations.

Brent Jacobs is the Engineering Team Leader at the International CCS Knowledge Centre and has hands–on expertise in working on the BD3 CCS facility and is an author of the Shand CCS Feasibility Study and Leigh CCS Feasibility Study.

About the International CCS Knowledge Centre (Knowledge Centre): with a mandate to advance the global understanding and deployment of large–scale CCS to reduce global GHG emissions, the Knowledge Centre provides the know–how to implement large–scale CCS projects as well as CCS optimization through the base learnings from both the fully–integrated Boundary Dam 3 CCS Facility and the comprehensive second–generation CCS study, known as the Shand Study. Operating since 2016 under the direction of an independent board, the Knowledge Centre was established by BHP and SaskPower. For more info: https://ccsknowledge.com/

About SaskPower's Boundary Dam 3 CCS Facility (BD3), located near Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada is the world's first fully–integrated and full–chain carbon capture and storage (CCS) facility on a coal–fired power plant. The full chain cluster of facilities is within close proximity to the BD3 facility, providing for a full demonstration and operation of proven and safe CCS. This comprehensive commercial operating experience provides insight into technology and other requirements which are not available anywhere else. The full–chain of integrated operation includes: Carbon Capture Facility; Transportation to Enhanced Oil Recovery; CO2 Storage at Aquistore; Carbon Capture Test Facility; Emissions Control Research Facility. To learn more, visit: www.ccsknowledge.com

Media Contacts

International CCS Knowledge Centre
Jodi Woollam
Head of Communications & Media Relations
jwoollam@ccsknowledge.com
T: +1–306–565–5956 / M: +1–306–520–3710

ccsknowledge.com
Twitter: @CCSKnowledge
198 – 10 Research Drive Regina, SK S4S 7J7 Canada

i United States Environmental Protection Agency. Greenhouse Gases Equivalencies Calculator – Calculations and References. https://www.epa.gov/energy/greenhouse–gases–equivalencies–calculator–calculations–and–references
ii International CCS Knowledge Centre. 2021. "Derate Analysis for SaskPower's Boundary Dam Unit 3 During the First Four Years of Operation;" 2021. "Reliability Improvements of SaskPower's BD3 Capture Facility Through Operational and Process Design Changes: Experiencing the First Four Years of Operations."

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/813d913e–25ca–4401–9185–50152d2b1478


Avid Names S’hail Holding Group as Master Distributor to Expand the Reach of Its Video and Audio Business Across Qatar

BURLINGTON, Mass., March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Media technology provider Avid (NASDAQ: AVID) today announced a new multi–year, multi–million dollar strategic purchasing agreement with S'hail Holding Group of Qatar. As part of this first such agreement in Avid's Middle East & Africa sales region, S'hail has established a new company, QPlay Avid Solutions, as sole dedicated representative and service provider for all Avid video products to clients throughout Qatar including TV broadcasters, film studios, post houses and audio creators.

"Avid is delighted to advance our relationship with S'hail Holding Group to enhance our operations and reach across Qatar, making it easier and faster for our clients to collaborate with us," said Tom Cordiner, Chief Revenue Officer, Avid. "This highly valued partner has repeatedly proven that it brings crucial experience and expertise to ensure that Avid can participate in and carry out some of our customers' most innovative and challenging projects. With the full–time focus of QPlay, we anticipate even greater success and satisfaction for our clients."

"Together, our companies brought the right combination for advancing the capabilities of clients across the Qatari media community," said Ziyad Eissa, CEO, S'hail Holding Group. "We are very pleased to expand our partnership and build on our track record to go further afield with Avid."

S'hail started as an Avid reseller in 2019. The companies have collaborated on a wide range of client projects, including upgrades to existing workflows and facilities as well as launches of new TV channels and other media providers.

About Avid
Avid delivers the most open and efficient media platform, connecting content creation with collaboration, asset protection, distribution, and consumption. Avid's preeminent customer community uses Avid's comprehensive tools and workflow solutions to create, distribute and monetize the most watched, loved and listened to media in the world""from prestigious and award–winning feature films to popular television shows, news programs and televised sporting events, and celebrated music recordings and live concerts. With the most flexible deployment and pricing options, Avid's industry–leading solutions include Media Composer , Pro Tools , Avid NEXIS , MediaCentral , iNEWS , AirSpeed , Sibelius , Avid VENUE, FastServe , and Maestro. For more information about Avid solutions and services, visit www.avid.com, connect with Avid on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, or subscribe to Avid Blogs.

2021 Avid Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Avid, the Avid logo, Avid NEXIS, FastServe, AirSpeed, iNEWS, Maestro, MediaCentral, Media Composer, Pro Tools, Avid VENUE, and Sibelius are trademarks or registered trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. or its subsidiaries in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Product features, specifications, system requirements and availability are subject to change without notice.

PR Contact:
Avid
Dave Smith
978.502.9607
david.smith@avid.com


Recipes with a Taste of Sustainable Development on the Coast of El Salvador

María Luz Rodríguez stands next to her solar oven where she cooked lasagna in the village of El Salamar in San Luis La Herradura municipality. In this region in southern El Salvador, an effort is being made to implement environmental actions to ensure the sustainable use of natural resources. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala/ IPS

María Luz Rodríguez stands next to her solar oven where she cooked lasagna in the village of El Salamar in San Luis La Herradura municipality. In this region in southern El Salvador, an effort is being made to implement environmental actions to ensure the sustainable use of natural resources. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala/ IPS

By Edgardo Ayala
SAN LUIS LA HERRADURA, El Salvador, Mar 31 2021 – Salvadoran villager Maria Luz Rodriguez placed the cheese on top of the lasagna she was cooking outdoors, put the pan in her solar oven and glanced at the midday sun to be sure there was enough energy for cooking.

“Hopefully it won’t get too cloudy later,” Maria Luz, 78, told IPS. She then checked the thermometer inside the oven to see if it had reached 150 degrees Celsius, the ideal temperature to start baking.

She lives in El Salamar, a coastal village of 95 families located in San Luis La Herradura, a municipality in the central department of La Paz which is home to some 30,000 people on the edge of an impressive ecosystem: the mangroves and bodies of water that make up the Estero de Jaltepeque, a natural reserve whose watershed covers 934 square kilometres.

After several minutes the cheese began to melt, a clear sign that things were going well inside the solar oven, which is simply a box with a lid that functions as a mirror, directing sunlight into the interior, which is covered with metal sheets.

“I like to cook lasagna on special occasions,” Maria Luz said with a smile.

After Tropical Storm Stan hit Central America in 2005, a small emergency fund reached El Salamar two years later, which eventually became the start of a much more ambitious sustainable development project that ended up including more than 600 families.

Solar ovens and energy-efficient cookstoves emerged as an important component of the programme.

Aerial view of Estero de Jaltepeque, in San Luis La Herradura, a municipality on the Pacific coast in southern El Salvador where a sustainable development programme is being carried out in local communities, including the use of solar stoves and sustainable fishing and agriculture techniques. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

Aerial view of Estero de Jaltepeque, in San Luis La Herradura, a municipality on the Pacific coast in southern El Salvador where a sustainable development programme is being carried out in local communities, including the use of solar stoves and sustainable fishing and agriculture techniques. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

The project was financed by the Global Environment Facility‘s (GEF) Small Grants Programme, and El Salamar was later joined by other villages, bringing the total number to 18. The overall investment was more than 400,000 dollars.

In addition to solar ovens and high-energy rocket stoves, work was done on mangrove reforestation and sustainable management of fishing and agriculture, among other measures. Agriculture and fishing are the main activities in these villages, in addition to seasonal work during the sugarcane harvest.

While María Luz made the lasagna, her daughter, María del Carmen Rodríguez, 49, was cooking two other dishes: bean soup with vegetables and beef, and rice – not in a solar oven but on one of the rocket stoves.

This stove is a circular structure 25 centimetres high and about 30 centimetres in diameter, whose base has an opening in which a small metal grill is inserted to hold twigs no more than 15 centimetres long, which come from the gliridicia (Gliricidia sepium) tree. This promotes the use of living fences that provide firewood, to avoid damaging the mangroves.

The stove maintains a good flame with very little wood, due to its high energy efficiency, unlike traditional cookstoves, which require several logs to prepare each meal and produce smoke that is harmful to health.

María del Carmen Rodríguez cooks rice on a rocket stove using a few twigs from a tree species that emits less CO2 than mangroves, whose sustainability is also preserved thanks to the use of the tree. Many families in the community of El Salamar have benefited from this energy-efficient technology, as well as other initiatives promoted along the Pacific coast in southern El Salvador. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

María del Carmen Rodríguez cooks rice on a rocket stove using a few twigs from a tree species that emits less CO2 than mangroves, whose sustainability is also preserved thanks to the use of the tree. Many families in the community of El Salamar have benefited from this energy-efficient technology, as well as other initiatives promoted along the Pacific coast in southern El Salvador. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

The rocket stove can cook anything, but it is designed to work with another complementary mechanism for maximum energy efficiency.

Once the stews or soups have reached boiling point, they are placed inside the “magic” stove: a circular box about 36 centimetres in diameter made of polystyrene or durapax, as it is known locally, a material that retains heat.

The food is left there, covered, to finish cooking with the steam from the hot pot, like a kind of steamer.

“The nice thing about this is that you can do other things while the soup is cooking by itself in the magic stove,” explained María del Carmen, a homemaker who has five children.

The technology for both stoves was brought to these coastal villages by a team of Chileans financed by the Chile Fund against Hunger and Poverty, established in 2006 by the government of that South American country and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to promote South-South cooperation.

The Chileans taught a group of young people from several of these communities how to make the components of the rocket stoves, which are made from clay, cement and a commercial sealant or glue.

The blue crab is one of the species raised in nurseries by people in the Estero de Jaltepeque region in southern El Salvador, as part of an environmental sustainability project in the area financed by the Global Environment Facility’s Small Grants Programme. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala/IPS

The blue crab is one of the species raised in nurseries by people in the Estero de Jaltepeque region in southern El Salvador, as part of an environmental sustainability project in the area financed by the Global Environment Facility’s Small Grants Programme. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala/IPS

The use of these stoves “has reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by at least 50 percent compared to traditional stoves,” Juan René Guzmán, coordinator of the GEF’s Small Grants Programme in El Salvador, told IPS.

Some 150 families use rocket stoves and magic stoves in 10 of the villages that were part of the project, which ended in 2017.

“People were given their cooking kits, and in return they had to help plant mangroves, or collect plastic, not burn garbage, etc. But not everyone was willing to work for the environment,” Claudia Trinidad, 26, a native of El Salamar and a senior studying business administration – online due to the COVID pandemic – at the Lutheran University of El Salvador, told IPS.

Those who worked on the mangrove reforestation generated hours of labour, which were counted as more than 800,000 dollars in matching funds provided by the communities.

In the project area, 500 hectares of mangroves have been preserved or restored, and sustainable practices have been implemented on 300 hectares of marine and land ecosystems.

Petrona Cañénguez shows how she cooks bean soup on an energy-efficient rocket stove in an outside room of her home in the hamlet of San Sebastián El Chingo, one of the beneficiaries of a sustainable development programme in the municipality of San Luis La Herradura, on El Salvador's southern coast. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

Petrona Cañénguez shows how she cooks bean soup on an energy-efficient rocket stove in an outside room of her home in the hamlet of San Sebastián El Chingo, one of the beneficiaries of a sustainable development programme in the municipality of San Luis La Herradura, on El Salvador’s southern coast. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

Petrona Cañénguez, from the town of San Sebastián El Chingo, was among the people who participated in the work. She was also cooking bean soup for lunch on her rocket stove when IPS visited her home during a tour of the area.

“I like the stove because you feel less heat when you are preparing food, plus it’s very economical, just a few twigs and that’s it,” said Petrona, 59.

The bean soup, a staple dish in El Salvador, would be ready in an hour, she said. She used just under one kilo of beans, and the soup would feed her and her four children for about five days.

However, she used only the rocket stove, without the magic stove, more out of habit than anything else. “We always have gliridicia twigs on hand,” she said, which make it easy to use the stove.

Although the solar oven offers the cleanest solution, few people still have theirs, IPS found.

This is due to the fact that the wood they were built with was not of the best quality and the coastal weather conditions and moths soon took their toll.

Maria Luz is one of the few people who still uses hers, not only to cook lasagna, but for a wide variety of recipes, such as orange bread.

However, the project is not only about stoves and ovens.

 Some families living in coastal villages in the municipality of San Luis La Herradura have dug ponds for sustainable fishing, which was of great help to the local population during the COVID-19 lockdown in this coastal area of southern El Salvador. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

Some families living in coastal villages in the municipality of San Luis La Herradura have dug ponds for sustainable fishing, which was of great help to the local population during the COVID-19 lockdown in this coastal area of southern El Salvador. CREDIT: Edgardo Ayala /IPS

The beneficiary families also received cayucos (flat-bottomed boats smaller than canoes) and fishing nets, plus support for setting up nurseries for blue crabs and mollusks native to the area, as part of the fishing component with a focus on sustainability in this region on the shores of the Pacific Ocean.

Several families have dug ponds that fill up with water from the estuary at high tide, where they raise fish that provide them with food in times of scarcity, such as during the lockdown declared in the country in March 2020 to curb the spread of coronavirus.

The project also promoted the planting of corn and beans with native seeds, as well as other crops – tomatoes, cucumbers, cushaw squash and radishes – using organic fertiliser and herbicides.

The president of the Local Development Committee of San Luis La Herradura, Daniel Mercado, told IPS that during the COVID-19 health emergency people in the area resorted to bartering to stock up on the food they needed.

“If one community had tomatoes and another had fish, we traded, we learned to survive, to coexist,” Daniel said. “It was like the communism of the early Christians.”

IFG Celebrates its 20th Anniversary

BAKERSFIELD, Calif., March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — IFG, the world's top fruit–breeding and licensing company widely recognized for inventing the Cotton Candy and Sweet Globe grapes, has reached an exciting milestone as the company celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. IFG is renowned worldwide for its innovative fruit–breeding programs that have changed the way consumers and retailers think and experience grapes and other fruits, and through the company's unique offerings of flavor–forward fruit varieties and its global IP licensing program, IFG has transformed the fruit breeding industry in the short span of just 20 years.

Today, IFG boasts 45 patented grape and sweet cherry varieties, and its network of licensed growers extends to all corners of the globe with 1,344 licensees in 15 different countries. Additionally, the company has grown to 55 staff members globally.

"At IFG, we have three primary assets: our trademarks, our varieties, and our people," said IFG CEO Andy Higgins. "Without each of those assets, we would not be the company we are today. As an organization that has Intellectual Property, we are committed to protecting our trademarks, our varieties, and of course, supporting our people in their every success and we are proud of the tremendous advances we've made to the fruit–breeding industry over the years. Our talented team has worked tirelessly to execute this ambitious vision, and to see it all come together is quite rewarding."

IFG was established in 2001 by several of the most prominent names in the California grape industry: Jack Pandol of Grapery, the Stoller family of Sunridge Nurseries Inc. and world–famous horticulturist and fruit breeder Dr. David Cain. Under the direction of Dr. Cain, who recently retired, IFG spent the past 20 years focusing on creating table grape and sweet cherry varieties to fill unmet grower and consumer demands and in the process developed a team of committed professionals who are passionate about protecting IFG's clients all around the world.

"We have accomplished a lot during our first 20 years and we are excited for our future as IFG is positioned to continue advancing the industry," continued Higgins. "We are engaged and committed. Dr. Chris Owens, our lead plant breeder, is bringing new and more advanced technology to create more intriguing and exciting selections. We have much more in the pipeline as we plan to lead while staying true to our mission. The past many years have provided us a strong and profound foundation for greater success."

ABOUT IFG
IFG, headquartered in Bakersfield, California and founded in 2001, is one of the world's largest premium fruit–breeding companies. Its breeders, Drs. David Cain and Chris Owens develop new varieties of table grapes and cherries, which are patented and licensed to worldwide marketers and growers. IFG currently has licensees in 15 countries and its fruit is actively marketed in over 30 countries. For more information, visit www.ifg.world.

Media Contact:
Olivia Riley
Bastion Elevate
olivia@bastionelevate.com


Analytica Announces Expansion of PeriCoach® Pelvic Health Solution into China

  • PeriCoach will be distributed through extensive network of postpartum care centres, hospitals, pharmacy chains, and online platforms serviced by the joint venture partners.
  • Joint venture will also leverage extensive network of over 30,000 clinicians in 100 cities to distribute PeriCoach in China.
  • Agreement builds upon Analytica's existing Middle East distribution partnership to facilitate growth and manufacturing of PeriCoach in international markets.
  • Clinical trial confirms unsupervised PeriCoach treatment is on par with in–clinic pelvic floor physical therapy for treating stress urinary incontinence, at a much lower cost.
  • PeriCoach provides cost–effective solution to improve quality of life, ease burden of care and reduce incontinence pad expenditure in postpartum and aging populations.

BRISBANE, Australia, March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Analytica Limited (ASX:ALT), the Australian manufacturer of the PeriCoach pelvic floor exercise system for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, has entered into a joint venture (JV) agreement to manufacture, distribute and market the system in China, Macau, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Analytica partners with Hebei NACOL Bio–Technology Co., Ltd (Nacol) and Shijiazhuang Biosphere Pty Ltd (Biosphere), based in Hebei Province.

Nacol key shareholders include two highly experienced Chinese medical manufacturing and distribution companies, Heibei Aineng Biological Technology Co., Ltd and Shijiazhuang YST Medical Supplies Co. Ltd.

The JV will register PeriCoach with the Chinese Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) as a class II medical device. With CFDA clearance, PeriCoach can become a prescription treatment, initially covering the hospital network in the North China area.

Expansion into China will support the distribution of PeriCoach to both the rapidly growing postpartum rehabilitation market and the early–stage preventative senior market, as one in three women worldwide suffer from stress urinary incontinence. The agreement furthers Analytica's strategy to bring PeriCoach into global markets, building upon growth in the Middle East with partner Motion Egypt LLC, and pursuit of other partners in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia outside of China.

PeriCoach is comprised of a medical device, smartphone app and the PeriVault, the largest pelvic floor muscle exercise database in the world. PeriCoach includes biofeedback technique guidance technology that helps women correctly perform pelvic floor exercises, also known as "Kegel" exercises, while the device and app are being used. Real–world data from PeriCoach patients1 shows that nearly 60% of women do not know how to engage these hidden muscles when they first use the device. PeriCoach technique guidance means "Kegels" can be done correctly and confidently by any woman in the privacy of her own home.

A recent independent, peer–reviewed, randomized controlled clinical trial2,3 performed at the University of New Mexico and published in the Journal of Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery concluded that the PeriCoach biofeedback system, with no formal instruction, is non–inferior and on par with in–clinic pelvic floor physical therapy in a pelvic floor centre of excellence, making this system the most cost–effective4 form of treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence. Watch Video Here.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at: https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1d7fc4b0–f47e–4dae–819d–b5db59eb359f

Currently manufactured in Australia, the new PeriCoach manufacturing line for the Chinese market only is located in the Shijiazhuang Free Trade Zone and will be listed as one of the major projects in the free trade zone and high technology zone.

PeriCoach will be distributed through the existing extensive network of hospitals and postpartum organisations serviced by the JV partners. The JV partners have collaborated with a leading postpartum care service platform in China with coverage of 100 cities and more than 30,000 clinical professionals.

In China, 15 million babies are born each year.5 With the rapid development of the modern economy, the postpartum rehabilitation industry has grown to 3.95bn yuan pa (US$608M) in 2018, with a compound annual growth rate of 43.9%.6

Furthermore, China, as with Western countries, has an aging population among which 31% of older women experience urinary incontinence, but only 25% of those currently seek medical assistance.7 The JV sees a large public health opportunity for conservative treatment of incontinence in women aged 50–70 years, reducing the quality–of–life impact along with the longer–term economic burden of aged–care.

The CEO of Aineng, Mr LanJu Xu, will lead the JV and comments: "We have strong confidence in Analytica's R&D capabilities and do believe that Analytica and Nacol can take advantage of each parties' strengths from this Joint Venture and achieve a win–win situation. Bringing together Analytica's leading technology and Nacol's extensive industry resources in China, we are looking forward to witnessing PeriCoach enter this huge market."

Mr Xu has a strong background in medical devices and materials, including a track record of 17 class II medical device approvals and completed clinical trials of two class III medical devices. He is also the Team Lead for Key Research & Development (R&D) Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology in China, which is operated by four leading universities and one of the top three hospitals in China. Additionally, Mr Xu is the lead of the medical material R&D Center in Nankai University.

Analytica Ltd Chairman, Dr Michael Monsour, comments: "Entering the China market with such nimble, experienced operators is a major milestone for Analytica. China is leading the world in recognising the need for effective postpartum care and is facing the challenge of caring for its large aging population by using the PeriCoach system to assist women with managing incontinence. PeriCoach is a proven cost–effective solution that will dramatically improve quality of life and burden of care for women. We look forward to the continued exploration of our strategic options to expand the availability of PeriCoach globally."

Analytica has recently moved its Australian manufacturing operations and is looking to re–establish online sales in the US, UK/Ireland, Australia and New Zealand in the near future. PeriCoach has USFDA 510(k) clearance, Australian ARTG registration, and CE–marking.

For more information, please contact: investorrelations@analyticamedical.com

For more information about the PeriCoach System, visit: www.PeriCoach.com

For more information about Analytica, visit: www.AnalyticaMedical.com

References

  1. Data on file.
  2. Analytica Announcement: https://www.analyticamedical.com/downloads/2020/20201120–ASX–ALT–UoNM–FPMRS.pdf
  3. Barnes, Kara Lauren MD*; Cichowski, Sara MD, FACOG, FPMRS"; Komesu, Yuko M. MD, FACOG, FPMRS*; Jeppson, Peter C. MD, FACOG, FASC, FPMRS*; McGuire, Brenna MD*; Ninivaggio, Cara S. MD, FPMRS*; Dunivan, Gena C. MD, FACOG, FPMRS* Home Biofeedback Versus Physical Therapy for Stress Urinary Incontinence, Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery: November 16, 2020 – Volume Publish Ahead of Print – Issue – doi: 10.1097/SPV.0000000000000993: https://journals.lww.com/jpelvicsurgery/Abstract/9000/Home_Biofeedback_Versus_Physical_Therapy_for.99288.aspx
  4. White Paper: Health Economics of PeriCoach for Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence: https://www.analyticamedical.com/downloads/2020/20201124–ASX–ALT–deWinterWhitepaper.pdf
  5. National Bureau of Statistics of China: https://data.stats.gov.cn/easyquery.htm?cn=C01&zb=A03060D&sj=2020
  6. Compound Growth: Overview of China's postpartum rehabilitation equipment industry in 2019 (report code: 19RI0824) by leadleo Academy
  7. Che, X. Y., Wu, S. L., Chen, Y. K., Huang, Y. B., & Yang, Y. (2019). Beijing da xue xue bao. Yi xue ban = Journal of Peking University. Health sciences, 51(4), 706""710. https://doi.org/10.19723/j.issn.1671–167X.2019.04.019: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7433489/

About Analytica Limited

Analytica's lead product is the PeriCoach System "" an e–health treatment system for women who suffer Stress Urinary Incontinence. This affects 1 in 3 women worldwide and is mostly caused by trauma to the pelvic floor muscles as a result of pregnancy, childbirth and menopause.

PeriCoach comprises a device, web portal and smartphone app. The device evaluates activity in pelvic floor muscles. This information is transmitted to a smartphone app and can be loaded to a cloud database where physicians can monitor patient progress via web portal. This novel system enables physicians to remotely determine if a woman is performing her pelvic floor exercises and if these are improving her condition. Strengthening of the pelvic floor muscles can also potentially improve sexual sensation or satisfaction and orgasm potential in some women.

PeriCoach has regulatory clearance for urinary incontinence in Australia and has CE mark and USFDA 510(k) clearance.

PeriCoach also has clearance in Australia, and CE Marking in Europe for the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, a condition that affects up to 1 in 5 women during their lifetime.

Contact:
Geoff Daly, CEO
investorrelations@analyticamedical.com


Al Tamimi & Company opens office in Port Said, Egypt, as it continues to invest in the MENA region

Star Capital Building), 10th Floor, Geziret El Arab Street, Mohandseen, Giza.– CAIRO, Egypt., March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Cairo, Egypt, 31st, March 2021 "" Al Tamimi & Company, the leading law firm in the Middle East and North Africa, builds on its strategic expansion plans in the African continent. With the establishment of the office in Port Said, one of the region's leading transhipment hubs, Al Tamimi & Company will provide critical guidance to companies navigating complex cross–border transactions in the maritime, shipping and customs sectors.

Samer Qudah, Managing Partner at Al Tamimi & Company commented:

"We have ambitious plans for the future and continue to invest in the region. We see many opportunities, especially in the African continent, and expanding our service offering and building on our presence in Egypt with the opening of an office in Port Said is a logical next step for us. We look forward to helping our clients achieve greater growth and stability in this rapidly evolving market."

Omar Omar, Head of Transport & Logistics commented:

"Opening this office in Port Said is not only testament to the commitment the firm has in the region and our expansion plans in Africa, but it also shows our commitment to the transport and logistics sector and more specifically our shipping clients. We continue to be very active in the region and benefit from the many opportunities the MENA region and Egypt specifically has to offer. We are proud that we can now support our clients with their queries on the ground in one of the region's major shipping hubs."

Ayman Nour, Head of Cairo office also commented:

"Port Said and Alexandria are the main stations for shipping and customs operations in the region and Egypt respectively. Opening an office there will signify the importance of our legal presence in the customs sector. This is an exciting opportunity for us to expand our legal services to our clients in additional sectors in Egypt and the investment shows a clear commitment to our existing clients and business partners".

The office will be led by Hany Maamoon, Senior Counsel and an experienced lawyer who is actively involved in the customs, insurance and transport sectors. Prior to joining Al Tamimi, Hany worked in the legal department of Port Said Port Authority, then joined a law firm in 2005 where he became a Partner. Hany was also admitted to the High Court of Appeals in Egypt, where he specialises in shipping law.

The opening of the Port Said office follows a range of recent investments in the firm's service offering in Egypt, where they most recently welcomed five banking and finance lawyers to its Cairo team and also invested in local resource based in Alexandria.


Al Tamimi & Company opens office in Port Said, Egypt, as it continues to invest in the MENA region

Star Capital Building), 10th Floor, Geziret El Arab Street, Mohandseen, Giza.– CAIRO, Egypt., March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Cairo, Egypt, 31st, March 2021 "" Al Tamimi & Company, the leading law firm in the Middle East and North Africa, builds on its strategic expansion plans in the African continent. With the establishment of the office in Port Said, one of the region's leading transhipment hubs, Al Tamimi & Company will provide critical guidance to companies navigating complex cross–border transactions in the maritime, shipping and customs sectors.

Samer Qudah, Managing Partner at Al Tamimi & Company commented:

"We have ambitious plans for the future and continue to invest in the region. We see many opportunities, especially in the African continent, and expanding our service offering and building on our presence in Egypt with the opening of an office in Port Said is a logical next step for us. We look forward to helping our clients achieve greater growth and stability in this rapidly evolving market."

Omar Omar, Head of Transport & Logistics commented:

"Opening this office in Port Said is not only testament to the commitment the firm has in the region and our expansion plans in Africa, but it also shows our commitment to the transport and logistics sector and more specifically our shipping clients. We continue to be very active in the region and benefit from the many opportunities the MENA region and Egypt specifically has to offer. We are proud that we can now support our clients with their queries on the ground in one of the region's major shipping hubs."

Ayman Nour, Head of Cairo office also commented:

"Port Said and Alexandria are the main stations for shipping and customs operations in the region and Egypt respectively. Opening an office there will signify the importance of our legal presence in the customs sector. This is an exciting opportunity for us to expand our legal services to our clients in additional sectors in Egypt and the investment shows a clear commitment to our existing clients and business partners".

The office will be led by Hany Maamoon, Senior Counsel and an experienced lawyer who is actively involved in the customs, insurance and transport sectors. Prior to joining Al Tamimi, Hany worked in the legal department of Port Said Port Authority, then joined a law firm in 2005 where he became a Partner. Hany was also admitted to the High Court of Appeals in Egypt, where he specialises in shipping law.

The opening of the Port Said office follows a range of recent investments in the firm's service offering in Egypt, where they most recently welcomed five banking and finance lawyers to its Cairo team and also invested in local resource based in Alexandria.


FXCM Launches Social and Copy Trading via ZuluTrade platform

LONDON and SYDNEY, Australia and JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, March 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — FXCM Group, LLC ("FXCM Group' or "FXCM'), the leading international provider of online foreign exchange (FX) trading, CFD trading and related services, has expanded its FX and CFD trading offering by providing customers with social and copy trading capabilities.

Social and copy trading have emerged as a popular addition to the retail trading market. Through this offering, FXCM customers can copy a high–performing Trader's signals and strategies, removing the need to speculate themselves and instead follow more experienced market participants.

The platform, powered by ZuluTrade, identifies rankings of Traders' performance which makes it easy for customers to identify Traders to follow and invest with. The platform also highlights the current "Rising Stars', including Traders who have had recent successes and are closing in on their all–time–highs. Customers can also choose to follow dynamic combinations of Individual Traders called "Combos' for their trading strategy. Combos use a point–based algorithm that has been set up for identifying profitable combinations of trading strategies. Combos are grouped in tiers that correspond to different risk appetites, from conservative to highly aggressive.

The Traders that customers follow fully explain their strategies and answer questions from fellow investors. This is a fully integrated platform that provides an incentive for Traders to ensure their strategy performs well, with Traders only receiving a percentage of the profits generated for their investor.

Brendan Callan, CEO of FXCM, said: "When beginning a trading career, it can often seem overwhelming to create an initial strategy. Market volatility, trading products and risk appetite are all new elements for customers to consider when exploring profit–making strategies."

"Social trading gives customers a great choice, especially when beginning to trade. By following an independent Trader, customers can view the Trader's performance over a period of time and make an informed decision before parting with their money. We've made it easier than ever for customers to have confidence in their chosen strategy."

About FXCM:

FXCM is a leading provider of online foreign exchange (FX) trading, CFD trading, and related services. Founded in 1999, the company's mission is to provide global traders with access to the world's largest and most liquid market by offering innovative trading tools, hiring excellent trading educators, meeting strict financial standards and striving for the best online trading experience in the market. Clients have the advantage of mobile trading, one–click order execution and trading from real–time charts. In addition, FXCM offers educational courses on FX trading and provides trading tools, proprietary data and premium resources. FXCM Pro provides retail brokers, small hedge funds and emerging market banks access to wholesale execution and liquidity, while providing high and medium frequency funds access to prime brokerage services via FXCM Prime. FXCM is a Leucadia Company.

Forex Capital Markets Limited: FCA registration number 217689 (www.fxcm.com/uk)

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.

76.31% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.

You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

FXCM EU LTD: CySEC license number 392/20 (www.fxcm.com/eu)

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.

Between 74–89% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs.

You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

FXCM Australia Pty. Limited: AFSL 309763. Losses can exceed your deposited funds. The products may not be suitable for all investors. Please ensure that you fully understand the risks involved. If you decide to trade products offered by FXCM AU, you must read and understand the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business on www.fxcm.com/au.

FXCM South Africa (PTY) Ltd: FSP No 46534 (www.fxcm.com/za). Our service includes products that are traded on margin and carry a risk of losses in excess of your deposited funds. The products may not be suitable for all investors. Please ensure that you fully understand the risks involved.

FXCM Markets Limited: Losses can exceed deposited funds. (www.fxcm.com/markets).

Media contact:

Chatsworth Communications
+44 (0) 20 7440 9780
fxcm@chatsworthcommunications.com


What’s in a Hurricane Name? Dorian, Laura, Eta & Iota Retired from WMO List

Credit: International Geneva

By Michelle Langrand
GENEVA, Mar 31 2021 – The World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) Hurricane Committee decided at its annual meeting to retire four tropical cyclone names from its rotating list after assessing the record-breaking hurricane 2020 season.

After 2020, the names Dorian, Laura, Eta and Iota summon memories of deadly destruction. The four hurricanes were so damaging that the WMO’s regional body that oversees storm activity in North America, the Caribbean and Central America decided to cross out the names from the rotating list they use to designate these extreme weather events in the Atlantic.

Names are given by weather forecasters to avoid confusion between events and make it easier for warning purposes. Each region has its own naming system.

For example, in the Atlantic Southern hemisphere, names are in alphabetical order and alternate between women’s and men’s names.

When the events result in great loss of life and damages, their names are taken out of rotation and replaced with new ones. The committee’s decision brings the number of retired names in the Atlantic to 93 since storms began to be named in 1953.

“The RA-IV Hurricane Committee’s work is critical to keep our nations coordinated well before the next storm threatens,” said Ken Graham, Hurricane Committee chair and National Hurricane Center director.

“Hurricanes don’t care about international boundaries. We all face similar dangers from tropical systems. Impacts from a single storm can affect multiple countries, so it is critical we have a plan, coordinate our efforts, and share challenges and best practices.”

Last year marked a record breaking season, getting off to an early and rapid start with a record nine named storms from May through July, according to the committee.

Hurricane Dorian in 2019 was the strongest one on modern records to strike the Bahamas. Damages were estimated at $3.4bn and around three quarters of all homes on the island were damaged.

Last August, category 4 hurricane Laura ravaged the US state of Louisiana, resulting in more than 70 casualties.

Major hurricanes Eta and Iota also broke records as they landed both in Nicaragua only two weeks apart in November, when the season is usually winding down. The storms affected 8.3 million people across Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

“Developing countries and small islands in the Caribbean and Central America are increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of tropical cyclones, which can overturn years of socio-economic development in a matter of hours.”

“In 2020, we saw this once again with tragic effect,” said Evan Thompson, president of WMO’s regional association for North America, Central America and the Caribbean.

This season was only the second time after 2005 that the WMO had to resort to the Greek alphabet after exhausting the 21 names beginning with a letter of the alphabet. The season went through a total of six Greek letters.

However, the committee said that it would stop using the Greek system as “it creates a distraction from the communication of hazard and storm warnings and is potentially confusing”. It has replaced these with an additional list of names according to the standard alphabet, excluding names beginning with Q, U, X, Y and Z which are still not common enough in local languages for communication purposes.

Source: This article was originally published by Geneva Solutions and re-published in UN Today, the official magazine of international civil servants.

 


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Farming-Specific Loans Help Tanzania’s Smallholders Increase Productivity

Halima Elias Mtwethe from Mtepa Village in southern Tanzania is one of the smallholder farmers who borrowed from the Mahanje Savings and Credit Co-operative Society (SACCOS). Credit: Isaiah Esipisu/IPS

Halima Elias Mtwethe from Mtepa Village in southern Tanzania is one of the smallholder farmers who borrowed from the Mahanje Savings and Credit Co-operative Society (SACCOS). Credit: Isaiah Esipisu/IPS

By Isaiah Esipisu
MADABA/MAFINGA, Tanzania , Mar 31 2021 – Small agricultural loans, disbursed through mobile phones and targeting specific farming activities at different phases of production, have more than doubled food productivity among thousands of smallholder farmers in southern and central parts of Tanzania over the past three years, improving their livelihoods.

IPS travelled the region this month and spoke to many farmers who attested to how the new form of controlled village-specific lending resulted in their successful harvest.

Peter Lulandala, a smallholder farmer from central Tanzania’s Iringa Province, is one of those farmers.

Lulandala is servicing a TZS one million ($312) loan he borrowed from a local community bank. The problem was that once the money had been paid out to him in a single instalment he was unable to keep aside the funds for the various farming phases.

“We could borrow money, which was usually given in a single batch mostly during the planting season. For most of us, it was extremely difficult to keep part of the money in our houses or on personal bank accounts just to wait for the weeding or harvesting season.

“As smallholder farmers in the villages, we have many urgent things that always require cash. For example, it will be very difficult to see my children go to bed for the second day in a row without food and yet I have cash under my pillow or in my personal account,” Lulandala told IPS.

That was until three years ago when an innovative new money lending product became available in his village. Through the new model, smallholder farmers who belong to particular groups (like farmer groups or reside in certain villages), are expected to save some money with a targeted financial institution before borrowing three times their savings.

“This is an innovative product introduced to us by the Alliance for as Green Revolution in Africa in collaboration with the Small Entrepreneurs Loan Facility (SELF) project to help smallholder farmers access agricultural finance, and to help them use the money for the intended purpose,” said Khassim Masengo, the manager of Mahanje Savings and Credit Co-operative Society (SACCOS) in Madaba District, Ruvuma Province, southern Tanzania.

Farmers are guaranteed by two signatures of fellow group members. What makes the SACCOS lending different is that once the loan is approved, the farmer can only access it in phases.

“We disburse it in three phases so that the farmers can only access what they need during the planting season, then the second disbursement can only be released at the right time for weeding and top-dressing, and finally the last payment is for harvesting and post-harvest handling,” Masengo told IPS.

Lulandala said the new lending structure has worked for him.

“But since this particular cash is kept by the bank and with an agreement on how it will be disbursed, I will always look for an alternative way to feed my children as the money waits for the intended purpose,” said the farmer who hails from Itengulinyi village, 15 kilometres off the main highway that connects Makambako and Iringa towns.

The farmers are expected to pay back the loans after harvest.

“Once they harvest, we encourage them to keep their produce with particular warehouses, and based on the warehouse receipts, we can give them personal loans worth half of their produce for immediate domestic use or further investment as they wait for better prices,” explained Masengo.

According to Hedwig Siewertsen, the head of Inclusive Finance at AGRA, many African smallholder farmers fail to achieve their full potential because they have no access to agricultural finance.

She said that unless farmers have collateral to show that they can pay back loans, banks would not loan to them. Siewertsen noted that there was need to come up with innovative means through which smallholder farmers can access agricultural finance without necessarily offering collateral. 

“Our main aim is to improve the quality, cost-effectiveness, access and impact of financial and agribusiness products and services for smallholder farmers in Africa,” said Siewertsen.

Farm produce at the Igodikafu Warehouse in Mbuyuni village, Pawaga Ward in central Tanzania. Based on the warehouse receipts, the Mahanje Savings and Credit Co-operative Society (SACCOS) can give farmers personal loans worth half their produce for immediate domestic use or further investment as they wait for better prices. Credit: Isaiah Esipisu/IPS

Farm produce at the Igodikafu Warehouse in Mbuyuni village, Pawaga Ward in central Tanzania. Based on the warehouse receipts, the Mahanje Savings and Credit Co-operative Society (SACCOS) can give farmers personal loans worth half their produce for immediate domestic use or further investment as they wait for better prices. Credit: Isaiah Esipisu/IPS

According to the Food Sustainability Index (FSI), created by Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition (BCFN) and the Economist Intelligence Unit, increasing food productivity is vital, given the population growth and intensifying climate change. And this, according to the report, can only be achieved through new innovations.

It also notes that sustainable agriculture needs funding and this is particularly difficult in developing countries.

“It can be hard to funnel money in from investors, particularly for developing countries. In the FSI, the top ten countries most likely to attract investment in sustainable agriculture are all European, with the exception of the US and Israel. And while most countries in the index offer some form of public financing for agricultural innovation, 12 countries—nine of which are in sub- Saharan Africa—do not,” the report notes.  

Unlike MUCOBA Bank, which works with farmers in small groups of 10 to 15 members, Mahanje SACCOS works with villages. This means that SACCOS’s offerings are specific to members of these villages and it also allows for traceability and easy service provision.

It also gives SACCOS security because they are able to engage the borrowers in person and from their homes.

“For one to qualify for a farming loan from this SACCOS, the first requirement is that they must be descendants of one of the eight targeted villages, and that must be confirmed by the village elder of that particular village,” said Masengo.

“The main reason is that we need to work with farmers who are well known by the villagers, and whom we can access for extension services,” he said.

So far, 2,847 members of Mahanje SACCOS, among them 892 female farmers who hail from the neighbouring villages of Mahanje, Madaba, Lituta, Mtepa, Magingo, Mkongotema, Lukira and Kipingo in Madaba District, Ruvuma Province, Tanzania have become net producers of maize and beans over the past three years. They are now able to export their produce to neighbouring districts.

SACCOS has since been converted into a fully fledged bank registered by the Central Bank of Tanzania, and it is offering credit and savings services, but specifically for farmers from the eight target villages.

However, MUCOBA Bank, which is a community bank headquartered in Mafinga town in Central Tanzania, covers a larger area and targets smallholder farmers in far areas that do not have good infrastructural access to urban centres. It currently has some 50 farmer member groups.

“Our bank has agents who are also our agricultural extension officers on the ground whom we use to register farmers through farmer groups, then send us information via internet,” Philipo Raymond, the general manager for MUCOBA bank, told IPS.

With MUCOBA Bank, qualifying farmers are then given their money through mobile phones, and once they harvest, they can service their loans through the same digital channel.

With both institutions, farmers have been able to borrow as little as TZS200,000 ($87) or as much as TZS15 million ($6,520).

“Besides receiving the moneys in batches to serve specific needs, use of M-Pesa payment has made it easier for us because we do not have to travel all the way to town, and we have reduced the risk of carrying hard cash in our pockets,” Emanik Mgwiranga, the chair of the Nguvu Kazi Itengulinyi farmers group from Itengulinyi Village, 44 kilometres from the nearest town, Mafinga, told IPS.

The main crops grown are maize, beans and rice, but some farmers also include Irish potatoes.

In addition, the Mahanje SACCOS has introduced indigenous poultry farming to cushion farmers when farming seasons fail or when market prices for their produce are still low.

 


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