FXCM Group Reports Monthly Execution Data

LONDON and SYDNEY, Australia and JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, Feb. 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — FXCM Group, LLC (“FXCM Group” or "FXCM"), a leading international provider of online foreign exchange trading, CFD trading, cryptocurrencies and related services, today released execution data for January 2021. To view execution data including historical spreads, execution speeds and historical price improvement data click here: https://www.fxcm.com/uk/about–fxcm/execution–transparency/ .

January 2021 All Instruments Highlights:*

  • 62.1% of orders executed at price1
  • 24.8% of orders executed with positive slippage2
  • 13.1% of orders executed with negative slippage3
  • Average execution speed 32 milliseconds4

Highlighted Instruments January 2021:

Instrument Active
Trader
Peak
Spread5
Active
Trader
Non–Peak
Spread
5
Active Trader
Effective
Spread
6
At Price
Orders
Positive
Slippage
Negative
Slippage
BTC/USD 61.0 61.2 53.2 68.5% 19.9% 11.7%
ETH/USD 2.7 2.5 1.9 77.6% 10.8% 11.6%
LTC/USD 0.5 0.5 0.4 85.3% 7.4% 7.4%
XAU/USD 0.4 0.4 0.4 52.3% 32.4% 15.3%
SPX500 0.4 0.4 0.4 49.5% 30.6% 19.9%
NAS100 1.0 1.1 1.1 39.4% 37.8% 22.8%
EUR/USD 0.1 0.3 0.2 69.4% 21.1% 9.6%
GBP/USD 0.3 0.9 0.4 67.5% 22.3% 10.3%
AUD/USD 0.2 0.4 0.3 73.6% 18.7% 7.7%

For more information and to open a live account, traders can contact an FXCM specialist 24 hours a day, 5 days a week.

*These highlights come from orders that executed through FXCM Group from 1 January 2021, to 31 January 2021. Data excludes certain types of non–direct clients.

1Percentage of executed client trades# in January 2021, which were executed at the price clients requested.
2Percentage of executed client trades# in January 2021, which were executed at a more favorable price than the price clients requested.
3Percentage of executed client trades# in January 2021, which were executed at a less favorable price than the price clients requested.
4This defines the amount of time between when we receive the order until execution. This excludes internet latency and post trade booking.
5This data is compiled forex and CFD trading data from FXCM's Active Traders for 1 January 2021, to 31 January 2021. The data reflects average spreads made available to FXCM clients during all trading hours.
6This data is compiled forex and CFD trading data from FXCM's Active Traders for 1 January 2021, to 31 January 2021. The data reflects the spread at which trades were executed by FXCM clients during all trading hours.
#Client trades here cover stop, limit, "at market", and entry orders. Certain non–direct clients are excluded from the data. Limit and limit entry orders would only execute at the requested price or better and cannot receive negative slippage. Price improvements are subject to available liquidity.

About FXCM:
FXCM is a leading provider of online foreign exchange (FX) trading, CFD trading, and related services. Founded in 1999, the company's mission is to provide global traders with access to the world's largest and most liquid market by offering innovative trading tools, hiring excellent trading educators, meeting strict financial standards and striving for the best online trading experience in the market. Clients have the advantage of mobile trading, one–click order execution and trading from real–time charts. In addition, FXCM offers educational courses on FX trading and provides trading tools, proprietary data and premium resources. FXCM Pro provides retail brokers, small hedge funds and emerging market banks access to wholesale execution and liquidity, while providing high and medium frequency funds access to prime brokerage services via FXCM Prime. FXCM is a Leucadia Company.

Forex Capital Markets Limited: FCA registration number 217689 (www.fxcm.com/uk)

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.

76.31% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.

You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

FXCM EU LTD: CySEC license number 392/20 (www.fxcm.com/eu)

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.

Between 74–89% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs.

You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

FXCM Australia Pty. Limited: AFSL 309763. Losses can exceed your deposited funds. The products may not be suitable for all investors. Please ensure that you fully understand the risks involved. If you decide to trade products offered by FXCM AU, you must read and understand the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business on www.fxcm.com/au.

FXCM South Africa (PTY) Ltd: FSP No 46534 (www.fxcm.com/za). Our service includes products that are traded on margin and carry a risk of losses in excess of your deposited funds. The products may not be suitable for all investors. Please ensure that you fully understand the risks involved.

FXCM Markets Limited: Losses can exceed deposited funds. (www.fxcm.com/markets).

Media contact:

Chatsworth Communications
+44 (0) 20 7440 9780
fxcm@chatsworthcommunications.com


Mexico to Ban Glyphosate, GM Corn Presidential Decree Comes Despite Intense Pressure from Industry, U.S. Authorities

Tractor caravan to Mexico City farmer protest demands “Mexico Free of Transgenics”. Credit: Enrique Perez S./ANEC

By Timothy A. Wise
CAMBRIDGE MA, Feb 24 2021 – Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador quietly rocked the agribusiness world with his New Year’s Eve decree to phase out use of the herbicide glyphosate and the cultivation of genetically modified corn. His administration sent an even stronger aftershock two weeks later, clarifying that the government would also phase out GM corn imports in three years and the ban would include not just corn for human consumption but yellow corn destined primarily for livestock. Under NAFTA, the United States has seen a 400% increase in corn exports to Mexico, the vast majority genetically modified yellow dent corn.

The bold policy moves fulfill a campaign promise by Mexico’s populist president, whose agricultural policies have begun to favor Mexican producers, particularly small-scale farmers, and protect consumers alarmed by the rise of obesity and chronic diseases associated with high-fat, high-sugar processed foods.

In banning glyphosate, the decree cites the precautionary principle and the growing body of scientific research showing the dangers of the chemical, the active ingredient in Bayer/Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide. The government had stopped imports of glyphosate since late 2019, citing the World Health Organization’s warning that the chemical is a “probable carcinogen.”

The prohibitions on genetically modified corn, which appear toward the end of the decree, have more profound implications. The immediate ban on permits for cultivation of GM corn formalizes current restrictions, ordered by Mexican courts in 2013 when a citizen lawsuit challenged government permitting of experimental GM corn planting by Monsanto and other multinational seed companies on the grounds of the contamination threat they posed to Mexico’s rich store of native corn varieties. The import ban cites the same environmental threats but goes further, advancing the López Obrador administration’s goals of promoting greater food self-sufficiency in key crops. As the decree states:

“[W]ith the objective of achieving self-sufficiency and food sovereignty, our country must be oriented towards establishing sustainable and culturally adequate agricultural production, through the use of agroecological practices and inputs that are safe for human health, the country’s biocultural diversity and the environment, as well as congruent with the agricultural traditions of Mexico.”

Chronicle of a decree foretold

Such policies should come as no surprise. In his campaign, López Obrador committed to such measures. Unprecedented support from rural voters were critical to his landslide 2019 electoral victory, with his new Movement for National Renewal (Morena) claiming majorities in both houses of Congress.

Still, industry and U.S. government officials seemed shocked that their lobbying had failed to stop López Obrador from acting. The pressure campaign was intense, as Carey Gillam explained in a February 16 Guardian expose on efforts by Bayer/Monsanto, industry lobbyist CropLife, and U.S. government officials to deter the glyphosate ban. According to email correspondence obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity through Freedom of Information Act requests, officials in the Trump Administration’s Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture and office of the U.S. Trade Representative were in touch with Bayer representatives and warned Mexican officials that restrictions could be in violation of the revised North American Free Trade Agreement, now rebranded by the Trump Administration as the U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA).

According to the emails, CropLife president Chris Novak last March sent a letter to Robert Lighthizer, USTR’s ambassador, arguing that Mexico’s actions would be “incompatible with Mexico’s obligations under USMCA.” In May, Lighthizer followed through, writing to Graciela Márquez Colín, Mexico’s minister of economy, warning that GMO crop and glyphosate matters threatened to undermine “the strength of our bilateral relationship.” An earlier communication argued that Mexico’s actions on glyphosate, which Mexico had ceased importing, were “without a clear scientific justification.”

Nothing could be further from the truth, according to Victor Suárez, Mexico’s Undersecretary of Agriculture for Food and Competitiveness. “There is rigorous scientific evidence of the toxicity of this herbicide,” he told me, citing the WHO findings and an extensive literature review carried out by Mexico’s biosafety commission Cibiogem.

And even though most imported U.S. corn is used for animal feed, not direct human consumption, a study carried out by María Elena Álvarez-Buylla, now head of CONACYT, the government’s leading scientific body, documented the presence of GM corn sequences in many of Mexico’s most common foods. Some 90% of tortillas and 82% of other common corn-based foods contained GM corn. Mexico needs to be especially cautious, according to Suárez, because corn is so widely consumed, with Mexicans on average eating one pound of corn a day, one of the highest consumption levels in the world.

While the glyphosate restrictions are based on concerns about human health and the environment, the phaseout of GM corn is justified additionally on the basis of the threat of contamination of Mexico’s native corn varieties and the traditional intercropped milpa. The final article in the decree states the purpose is to contribute “to food security and sovereignty” and to offer “a special measure of protection to native corn.”

The ban on GM corn cultivation has been a longstanding demand ever since the previous administration of Enrique Peña Nieto granted permission to Monsanto, DuPont, Syngenta and a host of other multinational seed companies to begin experimental planting in northern Mexico. Such permits were halted in 2013 by a Mexico court injunction based on a claim from 53 farmer, consumer and environmental organizations – the self-denominated Demanda Colectiva – that GM corn cultivation threatened to contaminate native varieties of corn through inadvertent cross-pollination.

“It is difficult to imagine a worse place to grow GM corn than Mexico,” said Adelita San Vicente, the lead spokesperson for the plaintiffs who is now working in López Obrador’s environment ministry, when I interviewed her in 2014 for my book, Eating Tomorrow (which includes a chapter on the GM corn issue). Such contamination was well-documented and the courts issued the injunction citing the potential for permanent damage to the environment.

As Judge Walter Arrellano Hobelsberger wrote in a 2014 decision, “The use and enjoyment of biodiversity is the right of present and future generations.”

Mexico’s self-sufficiency campaign

Mexico’s farmer and environmental organizations were quick to praise the decree, though many warned that it is only a first step and implementation will be key. “These are important steps in moving toward ecological production that preserves biodiversity and agrobiodiversity forged by small-scale farmers over millennia,” wrote Greenpeace Mexico and the coalition “Without Corn There is No Country.”

Malin Jonsson of Semillas de Vida (Seeds of Life), one of the plaintiffs in the court case, told me, “This is a first step toward eliminating glyphosate, withdrawing permits for GM maize cultivation and eliminating the consumption of GM maize. To end consumption we have to stop importing GM maize from the United States by increasing Mexico’s maize production.”

Mexico imports about 30% of its corn each year, overwhelmingly from the United States. Almost all of that is yellow corn for animal feed and industrial uses. López Obrador’s commitment to reducing and, by 2024, eliminating such imports reflects his administration’s plan to ramp up Mexican production as part of the campaign to increase self-sufficiency in corn and other key food crops – wheat, rice, beans, and dairy. Mexican farmers have long complained that since NAFTA was enacted in 1994 ultra-cheap U.S. corn has driven down prices for Mexican farmers. The proposed import restrictions would help López Obrador’s “Mexico First” agricultural policies while bringing needed development to rural areas.

Will Biden Administration block action?

Industry organizations on both sides of the border have complained bitterly about the proposed bans. “The import of genetically modified grain from the U.S. is essential for many products in the agrifood chain,” said Laura Tamayo, spokeswoman for Mexico’s National Farm Council (CNA), who is also a regional corporate director for Bayer. Bayer’s agrochemical unit Monsanto makes weedkiller Roundup and the GMO corn designed to be used with the pesticide.

“This decree is completely divorced from reality,” said José Cacho, president of Mexico’s corn industry chamber CANAMI, the 25-company group that includes top corn millers like Gruma, cereal maker Kellogg, and commodity trader Cargill.

Juan Cortina, president of CNA, said his members might sue the government over the bans. “I think there will need to be legal challenges brought by all the people who use glyphosate and genetically-modified corn,” he told Reuters, adding that he also expects U.S. exporters to appeal to provisions of the USMCA trade pact to have the measures declared illegal.

Industry sources also warned that Mexico would never be able to meet its corn needs without U.S. exports and that U.S. farmers would be harmed by the presumed loss of the Mexican export market. Others quickly pointed out that Mexico was not banning U.S. exports, just GM corn exports. U.S. farmers are perfectly capable of producing non-GM corn at comparable prices, according to seed industry sources, so the ruling could encourage the development of a premium market in the United States for non-GMO corn, something U.S. consumers have been demanding for years.

Such pressures may present an early test for President Joe Biden and his nominee for U.S. Trade Representative, Katherine Tai, whose confirmation hearing is scheduled for February 25. Tai won high marks for helping get stricter labor and environmental provisions into the agreement that replaced NAFTA. Will she and the Biden administration respect Mexico’s sovereign right to enact policies designed to protect the Mexican public and the environment while promoting Mexican rural development?

Victor Suárez certainly hopes so. “Our rationale is based on the precautionary principle in the face of environmental risks as well as the right of the Mexican government to take action in favor of the public good, in important areas such as public health and the environment,” he told me.

“We are a sovereign nation with a democratic government,” he continued, “which came to power with the support of the majority of citizens, one that places compliance with our constitution and respect for human rights above all private interests.”

Timothy A. Wise is a senior advisor with the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and the author of Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food.

 


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Is the USA Fit to Rejoin the UN Human Rights Council?

National civic space ratings from the CIVICUS Monitor, which uses up-to-date information and indicators to assess the state of freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression for all UN Member States. Credit: CIVICUS Monitor

By Emily Standfield
TORONTO, Canada, Feb 24 2021 – A month into Joe Biden’s presidency, the U.S. has rejoined nearly all the multilateral institutions and international commitments that it withdrew from under Trump. These include the World Health Organization and the Paris Climate Accords.

Most recently, on February 8th, the U.S. announced it would also rejoin the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) as an observer. The U.S.’ role in the human rights forum looks different than it did four years ago in light of its recent track record on civil liberties.

The HRC has two primary functions: to draft and adopt new standards for human rights and to conduct investigations into specific human rights issues. In 2018, U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the U.S. would be leaving the HRC, claiming that it was a barrier to any genuine global human rights protection. The U.S. had two primary grievances.

First, that the HRC has an “unconscionable” and “chronic bias” against Israel. And second, that the HRC’s membership criteria allows chronic human rights abusers to have a seat on the Council. Neither of which are entirely baseless claims.

Israel remains the only country-specific agenda item covered at every HRC meeting and Russia, China, and Eritrea — to name a few — all currently hold seats on the Council and have some of the worst human rights records in the world.

Emily Standfield. Credit: CIVICUS

On Monday, the HRC’s 47 member states met for its 46th session, it’s third time meeting since the beginning of the pandemic. The further decline of political and civil rights as enshrined in international law will be an unavoidable hot topic.

The CIVICUS Monitor which rates UN member states’ track records of upholding the legal tenets of freedom of expression, freedom of peaceful assembly and freedom of association finds that 30 of the Council’s full member states routinely and severely restrict these rights.

And in the case of its newest observer state, the USA was recently downgraded to the Monitor’s third worst civic space rating of ‘Obstructed’. The body is a long way off from adequately representing its values.

In the case of the USA, the rating change and decline in rights is reflected by the police response to the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protest movement. During protests in 2020, law enforcement detained thousands of demonstrators, used teargas and projectiles to disperse crowds, and attacked journalists, despite the fact that most wore media credentials.

President Trump and other authority figures encouraged police officers to respond forcefully and, in some cases, requested such violent actions for their own benefit. In a perfect example of this, the Attorney General ordered the use of teargas against peaceful protesters so that President Trump could have a photo-op in front of a church.

While the BLM protests may have made the decline in civic freedoms abundantly clear, this rating change represents a longer deterioration of political and civil rights.

In response, in June the HRC unanimously passed a mandate that called for a report on ‘systemic racism’ targeted at individuals of African descent. Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, whose murder at the hands of white police officers began the mass protests, called on the human rights body to examine the U.S.’ history of racial injustice and police brutality.

In the end, the final resolution passed by the HRC called for an investigation of systemic racism globally and regrettably did not single out the U.S.

While Biden has rejoined the HRC as an observer, the U.S. must win elections in October 2021 if it wants to regain its seat on the Council. In 2019, Biden said, “American leadership on human rights must begin at home” and — in some ways — it has.

The BLM protests have sparked a degree of state and local level police reform, and Biden has made a commitment to achieving racial equity. While the U.S. should focus on improving freedoms within its borders, it should also not exempt itself from becoming a full member of the HRC again in October.

Former President Barack Obama ran for a seat on the Council because he believed the U.S. could do more to advance human rights as a member of the body. This turned out to be true— the U.S. supported the creation of several important international commissions of inquiry to investigate human rights violations.

If the rationale by Trump was that leaving the council would do more for human rights than holding a seat, it’s clear that this has not come to fruition. Whether it is freedom of speech or the right to peacefully protest, today more of the world’s population lives in ‘Closed’, ‘Repressed’ or ‘Obstructed’ countries as compared to four years ago, finds the CIVICUS Monitor.

Leadership is needed at the UN Human Rights Council on these issues, but it must come from those that have a full seat at the table and have a demonstrated track record of upholding their commitments. The U.S. is currently disqualified on both accounts. Credibility and moral leadership must come from somewhere else.

Instead, the U.S. must support other member states that are leading by example on these issues. Seven members of the HRC — Denmark, Germany, Uruguay, Netherlands, Marshall Islands, and Czechia — are rated ‘Open’ by the CIVICUS Monitor, the highest civic space rating a country can achieve.

These countries are adequately representing the values that the HRC is committed to defending. While there are surely other issues at the HRC that the U.S. will prove influential, the country is far from the inspirational example it often likes to present itself on these world stages.

At the current session of the HRC, which began on February 22nd, the U.S. should champion these members who have made meaningful progress on civil liberties and be prepared to take a backseat on issues that it so obviously falls short on.

 


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JETEX MAKES FLYING WITH A REDUCED CARBON FOOTPRINT POSSIBLE

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Feb. 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Jetex customers are now able to choose to fly with a reduced carbon footprint from six key global locations following an agreement with Shell. This demonstrates how general aviation service providers can support the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and its commitment to reducing the industry's carbon emissions by 50% by 2050.

Jetex, an award–winning global leader in executive aviation, is fully aware of its responsibility towards the natural environment and to future generations, and pursues a comprehensive environmental strategy.

In today's world, private aviation is a vital global catalyst for growth, providing access to markets, supporting jobs and promoting travel recovery. In addition to its many positive economic effects, though, air transport contributes to the production of carbon emissions. In response, Jetex is working with Shell to offer customers an option to offset the carbon emissions of their air travel. Offsets represent an immediate measure that can be deployed at scale by compensating for CO2 emissions.

Every day, more than 200 aircraft fueled by Jetex take to the sky across the world. Being at the forefront of aviation fuel efficiency, Jetex is determined to reduce carbon emissions to continue developing without devaluing the environment. The new tool allows Jetex customers to calculate their flight emissions associated with the use of jet fuel and reduce them by choosing to invest in environment conservation programs. The programs are certified by international organizations such as the Verified Carbon Standard as well as Climate, Community, and Biodiversity Standard, and include protection or redevelopment of natural ecosystems "" such as forests, grasslands and wetlands "" to lower concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. To recognize customers' input, Jetex will be issuing certificates acknowledging individual contributions.

Adel Mardini, Founder & CEO of Jetex, commented: "With private aviation growing, we are even more aware that our future has to be sustainable. Solving the complex issue of climate protection requires a multifaceted response, and offsetting emissions on flights is just one step that we are adopting to reduce our environmental impact. By working with Shell, we have carefully chosen environmental programs to ensure they are proven and deliver CO2 emissions reductions as well as benefits to the communities and local biodiversity."

"We look forward to working with Jetex to help enable their customers to compensate for flight emissions by choosing Shell's high–quality nature–based carbon offsets," said Anna Mascolo, President of Global Aviation at Shell. "Until sustainable aviation fuels and technology are developed at scale, carbon offsets will play a key role in helping the aviation sector achieve net–zero emissions."

The new service is initially offered at Dubai, Paris, Singapore, Dublin, Dusseldorf and Salalah airports, with more locations being added as more of our customers want to lead the way to fly with reduced carbon footprint.

With energy and resource conservation being at the heart of its operations, Jetex is always looking to deliver the best value to its customers globally while helping them to reduce their carbon footprint. The new carbon offset program will provide a sound foundation for further globally orchestrated and genuinely effective environmental protection measures within the private aviation sector.

– END –

About Jetex:

An award–winning global leader in executive aviation, Jetex is recognized for delivering flexible, best–in–class trip support solutions to customers worldwide. Jetex provides exceptional private terminals (FBOs), aircraft fueling, ground handling and global trip planning. The company caters to both owners and operators of business jets for corporate, commercial and personal air travel. To find out more about Jetex, visit www.jetex.com and follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

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JETEX MAKES FLYING WITH A REDUCED CARBON FOOTPRINT POSSIBLE

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Feb. 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Jetex customers are now able to choose to fly with a reduced carbon footprint from six key global locations following an agreement with Shell. This demonstrates how general aviation service providers can support the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and its commitment to reducing the industry's carbon emissions by 50% by 2050.

Jetex, an award–winning global leader in executive aviation, is fully aware of its responsibility towards the natural environment and to future generations, and pursues a comprehensive environmental strategy.

In today's world, private aviation is a vital global catalyst for growth, providing access to markets, supporting jobs and promoting travel recovery. In addition to its many positive economic effects, though, air transport contributes to the production of carbon emissions. In response, Jetex is working with Shell to offer customers an option to offset the carbon emissions of their air travel. Offsets represent an immediate measure that can be deployed at scale by compensating for CO2 emissions.

Every day, more than 200 aircraft fueled by Jetex take to the sky across the world. Being at the forefront of aviation fuel efficiency, Jetex is determined to reduce carbon emissions to continue developing without devaluing the environment. The new tool allows Jetex customers to calculate their flight emissions associated with the use of jet fuel and reduce them by choosing to invest in environment conservation programs. The programs are certified by international organizations such as the Verified Carbon Standard as well as Climate, Community, and Biodiversity Standard, and include protection or redevelopment of natural ecosystems "" such as forests, grasslands and wetlands "" to lower concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. To recognize customers' input, Jetex will be issuing certificates acknowledging individual contributions.

Adel Mardini, Founder & CEO of Jetex, commented: "With private aviation growing, we are even more aware that our future has to be sustainable. Solving the complex issue of climate protection requires a multifaceted response, and offsetting emissions on flights is just one step that we are adopting to reduce our environmental impact. By working with Shell, we have carefully chosen environmental programs to ensure they are proven and deliver CO2 emissions reductions as well as benefits to the communities and local biodiversity."

"We look forward to working with Jetex to help enable their customers to compensate for flight emissions by choosing Shell's high–quality nature–based carbon offsets," said Anna Mascolo, President of Global Aviation at Shell. "Until sustainable aviation fuels and technology are developed at scale, carbon offsets will play a key role in helping the aviation sector achieve net–zero emissions."

The new service is initially offered at Dubai, Paris, Singapore, Dublin, Dusseldorf and Salalah airports, with more locations being added as more of our customers want to lead the way to fly with reduced carbon footprint.

With energy and resource conservation being at the heart of its operations, Jetex is always looking to deliver the best value to its customers globally while helping them to reduce their carbon footprint. The new carbon offset program will provide a sound foundation for further globally orchestrated and genuinely effective environmental protection measures within the private aviation sector.

– END –

About Jetex:

An award–winning global leader in executive aviation, Jetex is recognized for delivering flexible, best–in–class trip support solutions to customers worldwide. Jetex provides exceptional private terminals (FBOs), aircraft fueling, ground handling and global trip planning. The company caters to both owners and operators of business jets for corporate, commercial and personal air travel. To find out more about Jetex, visit www.jetex.com and follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

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Nyxoah to present at the Oppenheimer 31st Annual Healthcare Conference

PRESS RELEASE

Nyxoah to present at the Oppenheimer 31st Annual Healthcare Conference

Mont–Saint–Guibert, Belgium "" 24th February 2021 "" Nyxoah SA (Euronext: NYXH) ("Nyxoah" or the "Company"), a health–technology company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative solutions and services to treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), today announces the participation of its management team in the Oppenheimer 31st Annual Healthcare Conference on Wednesday, March 17, 2021. Olivier Taelman, CEO of Nyxoah, will represent the Company in a virtual session scheduled to begin at 8:40 AM (ET).

A live webcast of Nyxoah's session will be available on the Events section of the Company's investor website at https://investors.nyxoah.com/events or can be accessed via the following link:

Link to webcast

An archived replay of the presentation will be available for 90 days after the conference on Nyxoah's investor website.

– ENDS –

For further information, please contact:

Nyxoah

Milena Venkova, Corporate Communications Manager

milena.venkova@nyxoah.com

+32 490 11 93 57

About Nyxoah

Nyxoah is a healthtech company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative solutions and services to treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Nyxoah's lead solution is the Genio system, a CE–validated, patient–centered, next generation hypoglossal neurostimulation therapy for OSA, the world's most common sleep disordered breathing condition that is associated with increased mortality risk1 and comorbidities including cardiovascular diseases, depression and stroke.

Following successful completion of the BLAST OSA study in patients with moderate to severe OSA, the Genio system received its European CE Mark in March 2019. The Company is currently conducting the BETTER SLEEP study in Australia and New Zealand for therapy indication expansion, the DREAM IDE pivotal study for FDA approval and a post–marketing EliSA study in Europe to confirm the long–term safety and efficacy of the Genio system.

For more information, please visit www.nyxoah.com.

Caution "" CE marked since 2019. Investigational device in the United States. Limited by U.S. federal law to investigational use in the United States.


1 Young T. et al: Sleep Disordered Breathing and Mortality: Eighteen–Year Follow–up of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort, Sleep. 2008 Aug 1; 31(8): 1071""1078.

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LeddarTech Launches PixSet, the Industry’s First Full-Waveform Flash LiDAR Dataset

QUEBEC CITY, Feb. 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — LeddarTech , a global leader in Level 1–5 ADAS and AD sensing technology, announces its first publicly available sensor dataset for advanced driver assistance and autonomous driving research and development called the Leddar PixSet. This dataset is the first of its kind in the industry to include full–waveform data from LeddarTech's Leddar Pixell, a 3D solid–state flash LiDAR sensor. LeddarTech will offer these datasets free of charge for academic and research purposes.

Sensor fusion techniques are widely used to improve the performance and robustness of computer vision algorithms. Datasets such as the Leddar PixSet allow academic and engineering research teams specializing in ADAS and AD technology to use existing sets of sensor data to test and develop advanced software and to run simulations without having to assemble new sensor suites and collect their own dataset.

An instrumented vehicle was utilized in the development of the dataset. The various scenes were recorded in high–density urban and suburban environments as well as on the highway. The data was further augmented through exposure to various weather, lighting (e.g., sunny, cloudy, rainy), and illumination (e.g., day, night, twilight) conditions. The Leddar PixSet provides information from a wide variety of situations, creating real–world data for advanced driver assistance and autonomous driving.

Dataset key features:

  • Data from an autonomous vehicle's comprehensive sensor suite
  • Includes full–waveform data from 3D solid–state flash LiDARs
  • 29k frames in 97 sequences, with more than 1.3M 3D boxes annotated
  • Various environments, weather conditions, and times of day
  • Open–source API and dataset viewer

The Leddar PixSet was developed with the collaboration of Silicon Valley–based Deepen AI, which provided comprehensive object annotations. These new datasets provide an opportunity for 3D computer vision to go beyond LiDAR point clouds with a full–waveform LiDAR dataset and are now available on the LeddarTech website.

"LeddarTech is now and has always been committed to the advancement of autonomous driving. With the release of the Leddar PixSet, we are taking one step closer to making this dream a reality. By providing these datasets free of charge to scientific and academic communities, LeddarTech is supporting and encouraging the growth and success of autonomous driving and other applications requiring LiDAR technology," stated Pierre Olivier, Chief Technology Officer of LeddarTech.

"Precisely annotated data is key in the technology development of autonomous vehicles and an important step towards achieving safer roads. Integrating Deepen's AI–powered annotation capabilities and LeddarTech environmental sensing platforms for autonomous vehicles, Leddar PixSet provides a diverse set of high–quality datasets to move the community forward," stated Mohammad Musa, Founder & CEO at Deepen AI.

About LeddarTech

LeddarTech is a leader in environmental sensing platforms for autonomous vehicles and advanced driver assistance systems. Founded in 2007, LeddarTech has evolved to become a comprehensive end–to–end environmental sensing company by enabling customers to solve critical sensing and perception challenges across the entire value chain of the automotive and mobility market segments. With its LeddarVision sensor–fusion and perception platform and its cost–effective, scalable, and versatile LiDAR development solution for automotive–grade solid–state LiDARs based on the LeddarEngine, LeddarTech enables Tier 1–2 automotive system integrators to develop full–stack sensing solutions for autonomy level 1 to 5. These solutions are actively deployed in autonomous shuttles, trucks, buses, delivery vehicles, smart cities/factories, and robotaxi applications. The company is responsible for several innovations in cutting–edge automotive and mobility remote–sensing applications, with over 95 patented technologies (granted or pending) enhancing ADAS and autonomous driving capabilities.

Additional information about LeddarTech is accessible at www.leddartech.com and on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Contact:
Daniel Aitken, Vice–President, Global Marketing, Communications, and Product Management, LeddarTech Inc.
Tel.: + 1–418–653–9000 ext. 232
daniel.aitken@leddartech.com

Leddar, LeddarTech, LeddarEngine, LeddarVision, LeddarSP, LeddarCore, VAYADrive, VayaVision, and related logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of LeddarTech Inc. and its subsidiaries. All other brands, product names, and marks are or may be trademarks or registered trademarks used to identify products or services of their respective owners.

A video accompanying this release is available at:
https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fb731670–a03b–4016–abb0–defcd00472af


The Global Insecurity of Climate Change

Sudanese youth live with continuous insecurity due to climate change vulnerability, including droughts, desertification, land degradation and food insecurity. Courtesy: Albert Gonzalez Farran/ UNAMID/ CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Sudanese youth live with continuous insecurity due to climate change vulnerability, including droughts, desertification, land degradation and food insecurity. Courtesy: Albert Gonzalez Farran/ UNAMID/ CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Nalisha Adams
BONN, Germany, Feb 24 2021 – For Sudanese youth, climate change is synonymous with insecurity.

“We are living in a continuous insecurity due to many factors that puts Sudan on top of the list when it comes to climate vulnerability,” said Nisreen Elsaim, Sudanese climate activist and chair of United Nations Secretary General’s Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change.

She said this was directly linked to insecurity within Sudan. She noted that even a Security Council resolution from 2018 which acknowledged “the adverse effects of climate change, ecological changes and natural disasters, among other factors,”, including droughts, desertification, land degradation and food insecurity influenced the situation in Dafur, Sudan.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) ranks Sudan as one of the world’s most vulnerable countries when it comes to climate change. Increased frequency of droughts and high rainfall variability over decades has stressed Sudan’s rainfed agriculture and pastoralist livelihoods, which are the dominant means of living in rural areas like north Dafur.

“In a situation of resources degradation, hunger, poverty and uncontrolled climate migration will [mean] conflict is an inevitable result,” Elsaim said, adding that climate-related emergencies resulted in major disruptions to healthcare and livelihoods and that climate-related migration increased the risk of gender-based violence.

She also pointed out that women, youth and children where the groups most adversely affected by climate insecurity.

In January, inter-communal violence in Darfur displaced over 180,000 people — 60 percent of whom are under the age of 18. “Displacement has declined in recent years in Sudan, but many of its triggers remain unaddressed. Ethnic disputes between herders and farmers over scarce resources overlap with disasters such as flooding and political instability,” the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre said in a statement. There are currently 2.1 million internally displaced persons in Sudan.

Elsaim was speaking yesterday, Feb. 23, during a high-level United Nations Security Council debate focusing on international peace and security and climate change, led by United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson. The UK currently holds the Security Council presidency and will also be host to the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in November in Glasgow, Scotland.

“Land and resources in Africa and in many other parts of the world, because of climate change, can no longer maintain young people,” Elsaim cautioned.

She said in the youth’s search for decent lives, jobs and proper access to services, the new challenge of COVID-19 meant the only solution for many was in country, cross-border or international migration.

The issue is a global one.

Natural historian Sir David Attenborough addressed the council in a video message also giving a stark warning that the “stability of the entire world” could be altered by climate threats.

“Today there are threats to security of a new and unprecedented kind,” Attenborough said.

“They are rising global temperatures, the despoiling of the ocean — that vast universal larder which people everywhere depend for their food. Change in the pattern of weather worldwide that pay no regard to national boundaries but that can turn forests into deserts, drown great cities and lead to the extermination of huge numbers of the other creatures with which we share this planet.”

He cautioned that no matter what the world did now, some of these threats could become a reality, destroying cities and societies.

“If we continue on our current path, we will face the collapse of everything that gives us our security: food production, access to fresh water, habitable ambient temperature, and ocean food chains,” Attenborough cautioned.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the last decade was the hottest in human history and that wildfires, cyclones and floods were the new normal which also affected political, economic and social stability.

“Climate disruption is a crisis amplifier and multiplier,” Guterres told the Security Council. “While climate change dries up rivers, reduces harvests, destroys critical infrastructure and displaces communities, it [also] exacerbates the risks of instability and conflict.”

He referred to a study by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute which noted that 8 of the 10 countries hosting the largest multilateral peace operations in 2018 where in areas highly exposed to climate change.

“The impacts of these crises are greatest where fragility and conflicts have weakened coping mechanisms,” Guterres said.

The UN has already stated that 2021 will a be critical, not only for curbing the rapidly spreading COVID-19 pandemic, but also for meeting the climate challenge. Guterres has already stated that he plans to focus this year on building a global coalition for carbon neutrality by 2050.

Alongside the Security Council debate, the Fifth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly wrapped up yesterday. The assembly, world’s top environmental decision-making body attended by government leaders, businesses, civil society and environmental activists, met virtually on Feb. 22 to 23 under the theme “Strengthening Actions for Nature to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals”.

The assembly concluded with member states releasing a statement acknowledging “the urgency to continue our efforts to protect our planet also in this time of crisis”, and calling for multilateral cooperation as they “remain convinced that collective action is essential to successfully address global challenges”.

Joyce Msuya, the Deputy Executive Director for the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), noted that 87 ministers and high-level representatives participated during the two days. She shared some of the points of the dialogue noting that the health of nature and human health were inextricably linked. 

“For our own well-being we must make our peace with nature in a way that demonstrates solidarity,” Msuya said, making reference to a recent UNEP report

The report serves a blueprint on how to tackle the triple emergencies of climate, biodiversity loss and pollution and provides detailed solutions by drawing on global assessments.

Msuya added that the nature crisis was linked with the climate and pollution crisis and that the world now had the chance to put in place a green recovery “that will transform our relations with nature and heal our planet”.

She said the green recovery should put the world on a path to a low-carbon, resilient, post-pandemic world.

Meanwhile, Elsaim said that as a young person, she was “sure that young people are the solution”. She urged world leaders to engage with the youth and listen to them.

“Stop conflict by stopping climate change. Give us security and secure the future,” she said in conclusion.