Synchronoss Names Taylor C. Greenwald Chief Financial Officer

BRIDGEWATER, N.J., Nov. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Synchronoss Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: SNCR), a global leader and innovator of cloud, messaging and digital products and platforms, today announced that Taylor C. Greenwald is appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, effective immediately. In his new role at Synchronoss, Greenwald will oversee global financial operations for the company, including accounting, treasury, business planning and analysis, corporate development, and investor relations.

Greenwald brings to Synchronoss extensive experience managing all financial functions of large global public organizations. He most recently served as Senior Vice President Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Web Presence for Endurance International Group, an IT services company. Prior to that, he spent 18 years with Convergys Corporation where he held several senior leadership roles, including Senior Vice President Finance, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer.

"I am pleased to welcome Taylor to our senior leadership team," said Jeff Miller, President and CEO of Synchronoss. "Taylor brings to the table significant experience driving revenue growth and profitability for large companies in the technology and business service industries. In addition, he offers deep corporate development knowledge, including acquisitions and divestitures, proven proficiency with turnaround strategies, and a strong technical background. I'm confident his expertise and financial acumen will make an immediate impact as we continue to position Synchronoss for the future and ensure our customers across the globe have the resources they need to connect with subscribers in trusted and meaningful ways."

Miller added that Lou Ferraro, who had been serving as Acting Chief Financial Officer for the last quarter, will remain with the company as Executive Vice President of Financial Operations and Chief Human Resources Officer, reporting to Taylor. "Lou did a fantastic job after being asked to take on the acting CFO role earlier this summer in addition to his other responsibilities. The board and I look forward to his ongoing leadership with us going forward," Miller said.

Greenwald said he is excited to be joining the company. "The work that Synchronoss has accomplished in the past year to improve its business trajectory is impressive, and I'm honored to join the company at such an important time. I look forward to helping Synchronoss build momentum for revenue growth and deliver on its strategic goals for customers and its other stakeholders," he said.

Greenwald earned his MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology "" Sloan School of Management, and his bachelor's degree in engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology.

About Synchronoss
Synchronoss Technologies (NASDAQ: SNCR) builds software that empowers companies around the world to connect with their subscribers in trusted and meaningful ways. The company's collection of products helps streamline networks, simplify onboarding and engage subscribers to unleash new revenue streams, reduce costs and increase speed to market. Hundreds of millions of subscribers trust Synchronoss products to stay in sync with the people, services and content they love. That's why more than 1,500 talented Synchronoss employees worldwide strive each day to reimagine a world in sync. Learn more at www.synchronoss.com

Media Contacts

For Synchronoss:
Anais Merlin, CCgroup UK
Diane Rose, CCgroup US
E: synchronoss@ccgrouppr.com

Investor Contact
For Synchronoss: Todd Kehrli/Joo–Hun Kim, MKR Investor Relations, Inc., E: investor@synchronoss.com


Strong Growth Figures Hotel Industry good for investors

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Nov. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Barrows, the provider of hotel investment and advisory services for hotels in the Middle East, is very positive for the global hotel industry and sees huge opportunities for investors and developers.

Last year, the company noticed lower sales due to restrictions imposed by travel restrictions and declining demand for global hotel bookings. The turnover decline in hotel room sales was a fact, but the differences with the advisory branch of the company were very large. Never has the company managed to achieve such significant growth.

Many Hotels across the globe had massive problems and hired Barrows as their regular advisory partner. Today, the development of new hotels and the sales of hotel rooms are stronger than ever before. Investors are massively signing up for new hotel projects and they really come from all over the world.

The company expects strong growth in the hotel industry for the last quarter of this year and for 2022. "The economies are slowly closing, and world trade is returning back strongly," said Barrows Hotel Enterprises Chairman "" Erwin Jager. The market has been recovering for a few months now and hotels are opening their doors to the public again, which is giving a huge boost to employment.

Barrows Hotel Enterprises internationally manages more than 10,000 hotel rooms in more than 10 countries. The company started in 2008 as a real estate investor in the residential market in Dubai. Since 2012, Barrows has changed its strategy and the company is fully focused on the fast–growing hotel industry in the Middle East and Africa.

For more information
media@barrowshotels.com


Bombardier’s Safety Standdown Welcomes New Leader as Chris Milligan Succeeds Andy Nureddin in Stewarding Influential Industry Event

  • Seasoned Bombardier executive, Chris Milligan will continue to build on Safety Standdown's reputation for excellence
  • Bombardier's Safety Standdown celebrates 25 years of aviation safety stewardship and education
  • Prominent event promotes lifelong learning opportunities to highlight the industry's latest safety knowledge

MONTREAL, Nov. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bombardier's annual Safety Standdown event, one of the most comprehensive safety gatherings in the aviation industry, is honoring a dedicated Bombardier executive who has been a passionate steward and leader of the event for many years and announcing a new successor to lead the program.

Bombardier's Chris Milligan, Vice President, Pre–Owned Aircraft Services and Flight Operations, will take over the reins from long–time Safety Standdown leader, Andy Nureddin, who has led the Bombardier Flight Operations team responsible for organizing this annual safety gathering. Andy has planned to retire at the end of 2022 and is currently focusing on completing a smooth transition of Safety Standdown leadership to Chris. Anthony Cox has been promoted to Vice President, Customer Support and is succeeding Andy in his Bombardier customer–facing capacities.

"I am very pleased to introduce Chris Milligan as the new leader of the Safety Standdown team and I want to sincerely thank Andy for his steadfast commitment and hard work in fostering the growth of this invaluable industry event," said Jean–Christophe Gallagher, Executive Vice President, Services and Support, and Corporate Strategy, Bombardier. "For 25 years, Bombardier has led the industry in providing aviation professionals with critical knowledge–based aviation training in many key areas and Andy has been front and centre in that growth. I am confident that under Chris's direction, we will continue to provide aviation professionals with more lifelong learning opportunities and focus on disseminating higher standards of safety and professionalism throughout the industry."

Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the Bombardier Learjet flight operations team created the Safety Standdown event in 1996 as a human–factors safety training seminar. As it has flourished, its purpose remains the same "" to foster a community of aviation professionals who are committed to lifelong learning and to establishing higher standards of safety and professionalism throughout the industry. Through its overriding theme of "Learn "" Apply "" Share," this special two–day conference is filled with learning opportunities, compelling workshops, presentations and more, laying the foundation for many more years of safety training to come.

About Safety Standdown
Originally conceived in 1996 as a human factors safety–training event for the Learjet flight demonstration team, the conference quickly garnered a reputation for excellence beyond Bombardier's customer base. In 1999, in response to growing interest within the industry, Bombardier opened the seminar to all pilots. In 2010, Safety Standdown expanded beyond the seminars into a year–round global human factors program offering online resources. Since 1996, more than 10,000 corporate, commercial and military aviation professionals have attended Safety Standdown seminars worldwide, live and through the webcast, including in Brazil, Canada, China, Mexico, Switzerland and the USA. Admission to Safety Standdown has, throughout the years, remained free to all aviation professionals as safety is a top commitment to the flying public.

About Bombardier
Bombardier is a global leader in aviation, creating innovative and game–changing planes. Our products and services provide world–class experiences that set new standards in passenger comfort, energy efficiency, reliability and safety.

Headquartered in Montral, Canada, Bombardier is present in more than 12 countries including its production/engineering sites and its customer support network. The Corporation supports a worldwide fleet of over 4,900 aircraft in service with a wide variety of multinational corporations, charter and fractional ownership providers, governments and private individuals.

News and information is available at bombardier.com or follow us on Twitter @Bombardier.
Visit the Bombardier Business Aircraft website for more information on our industry–leading products and services.

Bombardier, Learjet and Global 7500 are registered or unregistered trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries.

For information
Matthew Nicholls
Bombardier
+1 514–243–8214
Matthew.Nicholls@aero.bombardier.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/850faa97–1ed5–42e5–b46d–f89bb5b87250


Bombardier Announces Construction of New Global Manufacturing Centre in Mississauga is on Track, Reiterates Sustainment of 2,000 Jobs and Commitment to Aerospace Community in Ontario

  • Set for completion in 2023, the new world–class facility for final assembly of Global aircraft will exemplify Bombardier's commitment to sustainability
  • Environmentally responsible features will reduce energy consumption by almost 60% and will lower greenhouse gas emissions by more than half
  • The state–of–the–art facility at Toronto Pearson International Airport represents a private investment of approximately $400M USD by Bombardier and will provide continued employment to the 2,000 highly skilled Bombardier employees currently working at Bombardier's existing Downsview facility
  • Bombardier reiterates continued involvement in the aerospace cluster through active engagement in the Downsview Aerospace Innovation & Research (DAIR) consortium and other initiatives

MISSISSAUGA, Ontario, Nov. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bombardier provided further details on the construction of its new, state–of–the–art facility at the Toronto Pearson International Airport that will optimize final assembly operations for its family of Global business jets, including the industry flagship Global 7500 aircraft. In an event attended by Bonnie Crombie, Mayor of the City of Mississauga, Deborah Flint, President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, Jerry Dias, National President at Unifor, and several other key representatives of the Greater Toronto aerospace community, the company reiterated its commitment to continue the momentum of its presence in Ontario.

On track for completion in 2023, the facility will provide a new home to the Global Manufacturing Centre, currently located in nearby Downsview, ON. The move, which represents a private investment by Bombardier of approximately $400 million USD, will provide continued employment to the 2,000 employees currently working at Bombardier's Downsview facility.

"We came here today to show you first–hand that construction of our new Global Manufacturing Centre of Excellence is advancing as planned," said ric Martel, President and Chief Executive Officer, Bombardier. "We are extremely proud of the people who have been producing our best–in–class business jets for decades here in Ontario, and with the rising demand for large–cabin, long–range aircraft, we are looking forward to providing our teams with a new, state–of–the–art work environment," he added.

The Downsview plant was built in the 1960s, and the transition to the new, 770 000 sq. ft. facility at Pearson Airport in Mississauga will significantly reduce Bombardier's industrial and environmental footprint in the area. The company is embracing the opportunity to incorporate as many environmentally responsible features as possible. Energy consumption will be reduced by just under 60% by focussing on natural and more efficient lighting elements, and newer heating methods and updated processing systems will lower greenhouse gas emissions by more than half. Considerably less water will be used in the manufacturing process thanks to the modifications implemented in the processing shop workflow. In parallel, electric vehicles will be favoured for onsite transportation and three Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) tanks will provide fuel for departing aircraft.

During the event, Bombardier also confirmed it will remain active in creating educational and job opportunities for future generations of aerospace talent in the Greater Toronto Area, particularly through its continued involvement in the DAIR consortium. The consortium, which the company cofounded with Centennial College, drives local collaborative research and development to help small and medium aerospace hub businesses scale up. "It is our continuing strategy to further support local innovation, harness the ingenuity of future aerospace professionals and enrich our local supply chain. Our involvement with DAIR enables us to realize this vision and it is one that we value greatly," said ric Martel.

Martel also emphasized the importance of local partnerships in facilitating the successful transition to a new production site. "I want to thank the City of Mississauga and the Regional Municipality of Peel, as well as our partners at the Greater Toronto Airports Authority for making us feel truly welcome in our future new home here in Mississauga."

"I'm so proud that Bombardier, one of the world's most innovative aviation companies, has chosen to make this very significant investment in Mississauga," said Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie. "By opening its new Global Manufacturing Centre of Excellence in our city, Bombardier will strengthen our world–class aviation sector by continuing its relationship with Mississauga–based companies that provide leading–edge capabilities to support Bombardier's family of Global business jets. I look forward to working with Bombardier and Pearson to find new ways to bring more aerospace investment to Mississauga"

"Toronto Pearson has a vision to be the airport of the future "" from our approach to health and safety through our globally recognized Healthy Airport program to creating a more modernized airport experience," said Deborah Flint, President and CEO, GTAA. "And part of being the airport of the future means building partnerships that confer greater economic and social opportunities on the communities we serve. Bombardier's focus on innovation and connection is a perfect fit for Toronto Pearson as we build back a better, more resilient, more innovative aviation and aerospace sector right here in Mississauga."

“Unifor aerospace members' skills are virtually unmatched and the aircraft they build are unrivaled in their class,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “The new production facility will help secure advanced manufacturing jobs for the long term and will be a proud new home for highly–skilled Bombardier workers for generations to come.”

"Ledcor is proud to be building Bombardier's new state–of–the–art manufacturing facility at Toronto Pearson International Airport," said Ray Lawrence, Vice President, Ontario, Ledcor Construction. "We are excited to work with the project and design team to achieve Bombardier's sustainability and energy efficiency targets."

About Bombardier
Bombardier is a global leader in aviation, creating innovative and game–changing planes. Our products and services provide world–class experiences that set new standards in passenger comfort, energy efficiency, reliability and safety.

Headquartered in Montral, Canada, Bombardier is present in more than 12 countries including its production/engineering sites and its customer support network. The Corporation supports a worldwide fleet of over 4,900 aircraft in service with a wide variety of multinational corporations, charter and fractional ownership providers, governments and private individuals.

News and information is available at bombardier.com or follow us on Twitter @Bombardier.
Visit the Bombardier Business Aircraft website for more information on our industry–leading products and services.

Bombardier, Global and Global 7500 are registered or unregistered trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries.

For information
Tinca Stokojnik Prouvost
Communications
Bombardier
514–855–5001, ext. 51674


Barrows Hotels is looking for acquisitions in Asia and Africa

LONDON, Nov. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Barrows Hotel Enterprises internationally manages more than 10,000 hotel rooms in more than 10 countries. The company started in 2008 as a real estate investor in the residential market in Dubai. Since 2012, Barrows has changed its strategy and the company is fully focused on the fast–growing hotel industry in the Middle East. Barrows' ambition for the coming years is loud and clear. The company wants to expand its range of services in view of the rapidly growing tourism industry. In addition, Barrows aims for international expansion in growth markets such as Asia, Africa and Russia.

In this context, an office was recently opened in Singapore. With its headquarters in Dubai, the company has a solid market share. The company has been growing strongly in Asian countries since the Covid19 pandemic. Barrows is a well–known gateway for the international hotel industry, acting as a real estate developer, investor and management advisory. Besides the hotel chains, Barrows has the most connections with institutional investors, but also counts family offices and high net worth individuals among its clientele.

By acquiring, Barrows Hotels is expanding its service offerings with various products in various Asian and African countries. With the acquisition, the company wants to grow into an important supplier in the international hotel industry in these regions.

Barrows Chairman Erwin Jager explains that the company will open offices in Johannesburg, Accra and Zhengzhou in the coming 2 months. Acquisitions of existing parties will quickly give Barrows enough scale to offer hotels a wide range of services. In addition to Asia and Africa, the Hotel specialist wants to expand in growth markets such as Russia from 2024. “In the meantime, we will continue to look at opportunities for acquisitions and collaborations. Barrows Hotels focuses on adding new markets and services to serve customers in the best possible way.”

For more information:
Barrows Hotel Enterprises
media@barrowshotels.com


Obtaining Water, a Daily Battle in Argentina’s El Impenetrable Region

Francisco Montes shows the cement tank where he collects rainwater in El Impenetrable. Scarce rainfall in the last two years has created serious trouble for the inhabitants of this four-million-hectare ecoregion, who are scattered around the Chaco region of northern Argentina. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

By Daniel Gutman
GENERAL GÜEMES, Argentina , Nov 2 2021 – Next to the brick or adobe houses of El Impenetrable, a wild area of forest and grasslands in northern Argentina, loom huge plastic barrels where rainwater collected from the corrugated iron roofs of the houses is stored. However, the barrels are empty, because it has hardly rained for two years, local residents complain.

“Things have been very bad recently. It rained one day in September, but very little,” said Francisco Montes, who has lived for 35 years in a house in a large open area in the middle of a monotonous landscape of trees and bushes, several kilometres from his nearest neighbours.

On the dirt road leading to his house, it is rare to run into a person or a vehicle, but it is easy to come across cows, goats, horses and even pigs, since domestic animals are raised loose in this area, to roam freely in their arduous search for green pastures.

Located in the Argentine portion of the Chaco – the great sparsely forested plain covering more than one million square kilometres, shared with Paraguay and Bolivia – El Impenetrable was so named not only because of the thick brush and the scarcity of roads.

The ecosystem covering some four million hectares also owes its name precisely to the lack of water, which turns most of the vegetation a yellowish hue and is made more dramatic by the combination with temperatures that can be suffocating.

From droughts to floods

Rainfall in the area usually comes in just three months, during the southern hemisphere summer. And rains have been scarce for as long as anyone can remember in this part of the Chaco.

But for two years now the situation has been worse than usual, because the drought has been especially bad, after severe flooding in 2018 and 2019 that wrought havoc among local residents and their livestock, when it rained three times the historical average.

In the absence of piped water, Montes, who lives on his remote property with his wife, is one of the best equipped in the area to deal with the complex scenario, because in his field he not only has a large cement tank with a capacity to store thousands of litres of rainwater, which lately has been of little use. He also has an 11-metre deep well that allows them to extract groundwater.

But this is not enough either. “The water is very brackish. You would have to go at least 20 metres down to get good water,” he told IPS.

Montes, however, at the age of 73, has the resignation of someone who has lived a lifetime knowing that water is a scarce commodity. “Back then we used to take water directly from the river or from a well, when it was available,” he recalled.

He was referring to one of the branches of the Bermejo, one of the biggest rivers in the La Plata basin, which originates in Bolivia and passes about 500 metres from his field. The Bermejito – or “little Bermejo”, as the branch is known locally – is one of the few rivers in El Impenetrable, and the vegetation on its banks is a deep green colour that is not usual in this region.

 Goats cross a dirt road in El Impenetrable, an ecosystem of four million hectares, where livestock is raised loose, to roam the area in search of pasture. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

Goats cross a dirt road in El Impenetrable, an ecosystem of four million hectares, where livestock is raised loose, to roam the area in search of pasture. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

A few kilometres from Montes’ home, near the entrance to the El Impenetrable National Park -a 128,000-hectare protected area created in 2014 – there is a 160 square metre rainwater collector sheet metal roof facility with two tanks that can store up to 40,000 litres.

It was built in 2019 to supply local residents, as part of the “Native Forests and Community” programme.

This Ministry of the Environment and Sustainable Development programme was supported by a 58.7-million-dollar loan from the World Bank and 2.5 million dollars from the national government and seeks to generate community roots in areas where there are no sources of employment.

Native Forests and Community benefits vulnerable rural communities, both indigenous and non-indigenous, through infrastructure works and training for the sustainable management of natural resources.

One of the programme’s priorities is to promote the use of renewable energies, and it has installed solar panels for electricity generation and solar stoves in areas where the most commonly used fuel is firewood.

According to official figures, the initiative has so far benefited 1,200 families from 60 communities in different provinces of the country, most of them in El Chaco and the rest of northern Argentina.

A community solar panel and rainwater harvesting roof installation near the El Impenetrable National Park in northern Argentina was built in 2019 by the Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, with support from the World Bank. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

A community solar panel and rainwater harvesting roof installation near the El Impenetrable National Park in northern Argentina was built in 2019 by the Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, with support from the World Bank. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

Esteban Argañaraz lives only 100 metres from the rainwater collector. Sometimes he goes to fetch water from the community tanks, although he cannot get enough there either, so he resorts to buying drinking water in the nearest town, Miraflores, which is 60 kilometres from his home down a dusty dirt road.

“This year I brought an 8,000-litre water tank. It cost 700 pesos (about seven dollars), but the complicated part was transporting it, which cost 4,000 pesos (40 dollars),” Argañaraz explained to IPS, while showing the well that was dug in front of his house to accumulate water for the animals and irrigation, which is completely dry.

Argañaraz, 60, and his wife have a garden at home to grow vegetables and fruits. But they have had to practically abandon it since 2020, due to the lack of water. Skinny cows and goats are another reflection of the severe drought.

The inhabitants of El Impenetrable rarely manage to sell any animals and almost everyone survives on social assistance. This ecosystem – environmentally degraded by the extractive economy – is part of Argentina’s Northeast region, which has the highest poverty rates in the country, with 45.4 percent of the population living in poverty.

But the situation is complicated in urban areas as well. In fact, the provincial capital Resistencia, with a population of 300,000, has the highest poverty rate in Argentina, at 51.9 percent.

Unpredictability is the rule

“The main characteristic of rainfall in (Argentina’s Chaco province) is its high variability: there are cycles of dry, normal and wet years. The other important aspect is that most of it is concentrated in one part of the year: in the case of El Impenetrable, the rainy season lasts only three months,” water resources engineer Hugo Rohrmann, former president of the Chaco Provincial Water Administration, told IPS.

Jorge Luna, a family farmer raising cows, goats and pigs in El Impenetrable in northern Argentina, stands next to plastic barrels where he collects rainwater and a solar panel that provides electricity. Rainwater harvesting is a very limited solution for families in the El Impenetrable ecoregion due to the lack of rain. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

Jorge Luna, a family farmer raising cows, goats and pigs in El Impenetrable in northern Argentina, stands next to plastic barrels where he collects rainwater and a solar panel that provides electricity. Rainwater harvesting is a very limited solution for families in the El Impenetrable ecoregion due to the lack of rain. CREDIT: Daniel Gutman/IPS

The expert pointed to another important fact: rainfall in El Impenetrable is usually between 600 and 800 millimetres per year, but evaporation, due to heat that can reach 50 degrees C in summer, is much higher – up to 1,100 millimetres.

“That is why neither wetlands nor aquifers with the capacity to supply a population are formed and there is no other choice but to collect rainwater, which is also scarce. The lack of water is becoming more and more evident and makes life more and more difficult for the local population,” Rohrmann added from Resistencia.

Constanza Mozzoni, a biologist from Buenos Aires who has been living in El Impenetrable for two years doing social work, has a categorical answer when asked what life is like for the local population, both indigenous and non-indigenous people: “Everything revolves around how to get water,” she told IPS.

Mozzoni works for the Rewilding Argentina Foundation, an environmental conservation organisation that works in and around the El Impenetrable National Park, and lives in a prefabricated house that also has a rainwater harvesting roof.

The foundation, however, provides all its staff with bottled water that is brought from the town of Miraflores, along the only safe road in El Impenetrable.

FRANCE: Translating a Harlem Renaissance Writer

By SWAN
PARIS, Nov 2 2021 – Claude McKay is having something of a rebirth in France, thanks to independent publishers and to translators such as Jean-Baptiste Naudy.

Naudy is the French translator of McKay’s novel Amiable with Big Teeth (Les Brebis noires de Dieu), one of two translations that have hit bookstores in 2021, generating renewed interest in the work of the Jamaican-born writer (1890-1948). McKay was a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance, a “cultural nomad” who spent time in Europe during the 1920s and 30s, and the author of the famous poem “If We Must Die”.

The first of the two recent translations – Romance in Marseille (Héliotropismes) – was published under its English title last spring, while Naudy’s Les Brebis Noires de Dieu came out at the end of summer during the so called rentrée, the return to routine after the holidays.

A third McKay novel, Home to Harlem (Retour à Harlem, Nada Éditions), has meanwhile been newly translated and is scheduled for publication in early 2022.

This feast of McKay’s work has resulted in profiles of the writer in French newspapers such as Libération, with Naudy’s expert translation receiving particular attention because of the intriguing story behind Amiable with Big Teeth.

The celebrated “forgotten” work – a “colourful, dramatic novel” that “centres on the efforts by Harlem intelligentsia to organize support for the liberation of fascist-controlled Ethiopia,” as Penguin Books describes it – was discovered only in 2009 by then graduate student Jean-Christophe Cloutier while doing research. His discovery came 40 years after McKay had completed the manuscript.

Cloutier and his advisor Brent Hayes Edwards went on to confirm the authenticity of the work, and it was published by Penguin in 2017. Fully aware of this history, Naudy said it was “mind-blowing” to translate the novel, and he drew upon his own background for the rendering into French.

Born in Paris, Naudy studied Francophone literature at the Sorbonne University and design at the Jan van Eyck Academy in the Netherlands. He describes himself as a publisher, translator and “text experimentalist”, and he coordinates “Déborder”, a book series published by independent publishing house Nouvelles Éditions Place. Within this series, he has translated African Journey by Eslanda Goode Robeson (2020) and now the McKay novel.

As a writer, Naudy, under the name of Société Réaliste, has himself published two books, in addition to essays and experimental texts in journals and reviews; and as an artist he has exhibited work in both solo and group shows internationally. One can find examples of his public art pieces around Paris.

 

Jean-Baptiste Naudy in Paris (photo by AM)

Jean-Baptiste Naudy in Paris (photo by AM)

 

The following edited interview with Naudy, conducted by email and in person, is part of SWAN’s series about translators of Caribbean literature, done in collaboration with the Caribbean Translation Project.

SWAN: How did the translating of Aimable with Big Teeth come about?

Jean-Baptiste Naudy: In 2019, Sarah Frioux-Salgas and I were invited by Cyrille Zola-Place, director of Nouvelles Éditions Place in Paris, to curate a book series dealing with unclassifiable texts, overreaching genres, intertwining topics. Our common interest for the internationalisation of political and poetical scopes in the 20th century, via the publication of books largely ignored by the classical Western frame of reference, gave birth to this book series, entitled Déborder (To overflow).

The first book to be included was a reprint of Negro Anthology, edited by Nancy Cunard in 1934, a massive collection of poetry, fiction and essays about the Black Atlantic, for which she collaborated with paramount artists and scholars of those years, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, George Padmore and dozens of others.

Since then, we have published five more books in this frame, like the first French translation of Eslanda Robeson’s African Journey, or Sismographie des luttes (Seismography of Struggles), a kind of world history of anticolonial journals, amazingly edited by art historian and writer Zahia Rahmani.

At the beginning of 2020, Sarah told me the story of a newfound book by Claude McKay, Amiable with Big Teeth, edited by Brent Hayes Edwards and Jean-Christophe Cloutier for Penguin Books in 2017.

Searching the archives of a rather obscure New York publisher, Cloutier had found the complete and ready-to-be-published manuscript of a completely unknown novel by McKay. The very fact that such a story was possible – to find out of the blue a full book by a major writer of the 20th century – was unfathomable to me. Nouvelles Éditions Place immediately agreed to the idea of publishing the book in French.

SWAN: Including your translation, there will be three novels by McKay published in French this year and next. Can you explain this surge of international interest in his work?

JBN: The renewed interest in Claude McKay’s oeuvre is global for sure, but also at times pretty local. The critical deconstruction of the Western ideological frame of thought has called for the exposure of another cultural grounding, a counter-narrative of modernity, other stories and histories encompassing the plurality and complexity of dominated voices, visions, sensibilities, positions on their path to liberation.

What was interesting for me was to try to understand or feel what the colonial condition was doing to the language itself. How writing or expressing oneself in a foreign language, an imperial language imposed upon a great variety of cultures, was transforming the language in return

To that extent, McKay is an immense writer, whose very life was bound to this intertwining. Like most of the key figures of the Black Atlantic, he has been largely ignored or under-appreciated by the 20th century literary canon. More than ever, he is a lighthouse for those interested in the interwoven problematics of race, gender, sexuality, and class.

But he is as well a singular figure of displacement, a critically productive internationalist, being at first a Jamaican in New York, then a Caribbean from Harlem in Europe, then a Black writer from France in Morocco, and finally back to the United States, a Black Atlantic wanderer.

Which is also the point of his renewed presence in the French contemporary cultural landscape. The very fact that one of the most preeminent actors of the Harlem Renaissance was, first, a Jamaican, and second, writing from France about the Americas and the global Black diaspora is irresistibly intriguing.

Another important factor is the crucial influence that McKay’s writings had on a number of Francophone literary figures of the 1930s, including the founders of the Négritude movement, the Nardal sisters, Aimé and Suzanne Césaire, Léon Gontran Damas, René Ménil, and many others.

In a nutshell, I would argue that McKay captivates nowadays for all those reasons at the same time. He epitomizes the Black international radical current that rose in the 1920s and 1930s, his critical scope is extremely contemporary, and he is representative of a certain blend of political and cultural cosmopolitanism that happened to exist in the French imperial metropole during the interwar years.

It is interesting to notice that the three books being published now in France deal with different periods of his life: Home to Harlem, his 1928 bestseller (translated Retour à Harlem in the new French translation to be published by Nada Éditions) is a luxurious portrait of Harlem in the 1920s, written while he was in France. Romance in Marseille, released last April by Héliotropismes, another previously unpublished novel from the early 1930s, revolves around the central themes of his most famous novel also set in Marseilles, Banjo. And thus, Amiable with Big Teeth, dating from 1941, being his last fiction and only novel ever written in the United States.

SWAN: In addition to your native French, you speak English and Spanish. Where and how did you begin learning other languages?

JBN: Where I grew up, English and Spanish were mandatory at school. So, I grasped some elements there, quite poorly. Then I had to travel. So, I learned most of my English with Ukrainian artists in Lisbon and bits of Spanish with Brazilian anarchists in Athens. How romantic…

SWAN: How did your interest in translation start?

JBN: My first encounter with the need to translate something happened I guess when I went to London for the first time, in 1997. Following a totally random move – because I liked his name – I bought a washed-out copy of Kamau Brathwaite’s Middle Passages. I had never read anything like that. For sure it sounded like street music to me, half a drunkard rant, half an esoteric psalmody, but the polyphony at work in this single text, the sound and visual poetics of patwa mesmerized me.

So, for the last 25 years, I have been trying to translate exactly that, the very sensation I had in front of this palimpsest of languages. A rant that would be a psalmody, at times unintelligible, at times neat as a scalpel slice. How language can be haunted by the spectre of the past while echoing potentially emancipated futures. What Rimbaud called “the long, immense, rational derangement of the senses”, inscribed on a page where words are sounds are signs are ciphers are colours are noises are tastes are notes and nevertheless, never more than words.

SWAN: Can you tell us more about other works that you’ve translated and how you selected these?

JBN: Last year, I translated African Journey by Eslanda Goode Robeson, and it was a delight. I have an intense admiration for Eslanda Robeson, an amazing transnational feminist networker and anticolonial advocate.

This book was a great success in the USA when it was published in 1945, the first popular book about Africa written by an African American writer. It is a travel diary, at the same time complex and honest, but I particularly liked how Robeson used this genre to create commonality between Africans and Americans.

For the anecdote, Eslanda Robeson and Claude McKay really disliked each other, their writing styles are almost opposite, as well as their social backgrounds and cultural framings; however, I think they were aiming at the same liberation and I love them both!

SWAN: How important is translation for today’s world, especially for publishing underrepresented communities? In the Caribbean, as in other regions, it sometimes feels as if countries are divided by language. How can people in the literary and education spheres help to bridge these linguistic “borders”?

JBN: When I was a student, I had the opportunity to study what we call in my country “Francophone literature”, so literature written by former and present subjects of the French colonial project. Or raised in the postcolonial remains of the French empire.

What was interesting for me was to try to understand or feel what the colonial condition was doing to the language itself. How writing or expressing oneself in a foreign language, an imperial language imposed upon a great variety of cultures, was transforming the language in return.

At its core, Francophone literature has a poetical abundance and a political tumult that always seemed to me in synchronization with the modern condition. Whatever be the scale and the observation point. What people from my neighbourhood in Paris, coming from all corners of the world, were doing via the vernacular popular French slang we were talking every day, the “Francophone” writers were doing the same to literature itself.

Upgrading it to a world-scale. As any other imperial language, French does not belong to French people, fortunately, and that is the main source of its current literary potency as well as the only sound reason to continue to use it.

The political side effects of this linguistic colonial and then postcolonial condition astonished me as well: how this shared imperial language allowed Caribbean peoples, Arabs, Africans, Indochinese, Indians, Guyanese, to relate and elaborate a common ground.

This tremendous poetic force and its radical cosmopolitan perspective bound me to translation, especially when I experimentally realized that the situation was exactly the same with all the other imperial languages, English, Spanish, etc. Suzanne Césaire was maybe one of the first poets to see the Caribbean not so much as separated islands (divided by bodies of water, empires, languages, political status) but as an archipelago, an extremely complex panorama whose unity is undersea and underseen. I consider that my task as a literary translator working on the Atlantic world is to help languages undersee each other. I aim to be a pidginizer.

SWAN: What are your next projects?

JBN: I am working on several translation projects. First of all, an amazingly powerful collection of short stories by South African wonder writer Stacy Hardy. Then, a beautiful and crucial book by Annette Joseph-Gabriel, Reimagining Liberation, dealing with the key role played by Black women in the decolonization of the French empire.

Finally, I will work on the first French translation of The Practice of Diaspora, an essential book by Brent Hayes Edwards, focusing on Paris as a node of the Black Atlantic culture in the interwar years. Its subtitle says it all: Literature, translation and the rise of Black internationalism. This masterwork constructs an analytical frame to relate together René Maran, Alain Locke, Paulette Nardal, Claude McKay, Lamine Senghor, George Padmore, Jessie Fauset, Langston Hughes, C.L.R. James, Tiemoko Garan Kouyaté, and so many more. As you can easily imagine, it is a mind-blowing book, and I am extremely proud to work on it. – AM /SWAN